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Benefit has really been making an effort to widen their range of products and formulas lately, which I think we all appreciate, BUT I’m still on the fence with the Hoola Quickie Contour Stick… I’m just going to state the obvious here and say that I definitely wouldn’t call this a true “contour” stick because it’s quite warm toned. On the other hand, it does make a nice bronzer for certain skin tones. It’s convenient and has a wonderful formula. I’ll get into more details about what skin tones this is best suited for, along with application tips later on in this post, so keep reading! And as always, I hope you enjoy this post as much as I enjoy sharing these new products with you!

This is a new but permanent product which you can purchase at Ulta, Sephora, Macy’s, www.benefitcosmetics.com, and wherever else that Benefit is sold. It goes for $28 and contains  8.5 g / 0.3 oz of product. That seems to be a pretty average price for something like this, considering that ABH’s foundation sticks sell for $25 and contain 0.32 oz of product. Since Benefit is a cruelty-free company, this was not tested on animals ❤

If you’d like to get updates on upcoming posts, stay in touch or chat with me, and get sneak peeks of new products that I’ll be testing and reviewing, be sure to follow me on twitterinstagram, and snapchat, all @ lesley_makeup!

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The Hoola Quickie Contour Stick comes in a tube that looks like a gilded stick of bamboo. It’s very eye-catching and perfect for summer! I tossed it in my makeup bag for a day to see if it held up well and it didn’t pop open or make a mess. The stick itself twists up and back down into the tube, so it’s well protected and convenient to use. My darling French Mastiff, Wednesday, ate the box before I could snap a photo of the ingredients list, but I’ll try to get one up for you soon!

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Alright, so let me give you the rundown on this “contour stick”… It’s not one, unless you like a pretty darn warm toned contour. Both personally and professionally when doing makeup on clients, I go for cooler tones 90% of the time when I’m contouring. Let me explain why: When you look at natural shadows on a face, which is what a contour mimics, they’re cool tones because, well, that’s what real shadows are! Therefore, if you want an actual CONTOUR, you want to go for a product that has less warm/red/orange tones, which is what this stick has. That said, I do think this makes a nice bronzer if, in MAC terms, you are a NC/NW15-20 to NC/NW30. The darker your skin tone, the more subtle this is going to look on you.

Now for the good news… The formula for the Hoola stick is fantastic! You have a lot of control with this type of stick and it has a wonderful texture! It’s a cream-to-powder product so it’s easy to apply and blend out and looks incredibly natural as a bronzer. This is one of those products that’s perfect if you’re in a hurry and want to add a little bit of color and dimension to your face without going for a completely beat look. I DO love that, especially for Spring and Summer, since this time of year most of us usually go for “less is more” look and want to look sun-kissed. Since it’s a cream-to-powder and dries quickly, you don’t have to set this with a powder if you don’t want to, which is great if you’re in a rush or if you have dry skin. I’ve discovered that it also works well with oily skin, due to the fact that it sets as a matte finish so it’s not going to fade or slide off. It does set relatively quickly, though, so you’ll want to be sure to blend this out as you apply it since it doesn’t give you much play time.

I wanted to love this product, I really did… But I don’t. If YOU do, that’s awesome! As we all know, not all products work for everyone because we all have different skin tones and preferences, and well, I just don’t prefer this particular bronzer (not contour). As I said earlier, this will work best if you have a light to medium skin tone, whether you’re warm, cool, or neutral. If you are very fair, this can take on an unwanted orange hue and if you have dark to deep skin, it’s not even going to show up! I really hope that Benefit will release other shades, similar to what they did with Hoola and Hoola Lite powder bronzers.

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Photo taken outdoors in natural, indirect sunlight. Product swatched on NC20 skin.

This stick is a light-medium to medium, cocoa bronze color with some almost peanut butter-like, warm, peachy-brown undertones. It dries to a soft, natural looking matte finish. The texture feels amazing on the skin, blending out easily and evenly. Color payoff looks as intense as it does in the tube, but may pull more yellow on cooler undertones (like I have). Coverage is full if that’s what you desire, but it also sheers down very well when worked into the skin. Wear time was the most impressive thing about this product, as it lasted over 12 hours on me without fading, even on a warm, humid day!

Dupes:   The only actual cream bronzer I have is the Soleil Tan De Chanel Bronzing Makeup Base that comes in the little pot, which is nearly identical in color, though it may have bit more of a neutral to pinky undertone to it. It also has a very subtle glow, whereas the Hoola stick has a natural matte finish. The bonus to the Chanel one is that it contains 1 oz of product and costs $50, which is over three times what the Hoola stick has in it, so you’re getting a lot more for your money with the Chanel product! I also feel like the Chanel cream bronzer works with more skin tones.

If you want to compare feel and formula, the MUFE Ultra HD Foundation Sticks are much more creamy and emollient, but you can find similar colors in them. I haven’t compared this to the Hourglass or ABH foundation sticks yet, but I plan to in the future and when I do, I’ll let you all know what I think!

Overall Rating:   4 / 5

*** Overall rating would be a 4.7 / 5 BUT since the name of this product is a little deceiving and it is not very versatile as far as skin tones are concerned, I had to knock it down to a 4.

Application:   4

Coverage:  4

Color Payoff:   5

Texture:   4

Wear Time:   4

Packaging:   5

Application:

As Bronzer:   When applying this as a bronzer, you’ll want to put it on the areas of the face you’d like to give color and soft dimension to, then buff it out with some type of tapered brush. A few of my favorites for a more diffused look are MAC’s 109 Small Contour Brush and 168 Large Angled Contour Brush, Morphe’s R1 Deluxe Pointed Powder Brush (same thing as their other types of “pointed powder” brushes), or R13 Pointed Contour Brush (same thing as their other Pointed Contour Brushes), Real Techniques Contour Brush (yellow/gold handle), and Zoeva’s 110 Face Shaper Brush. You basically just want something that’s tapered, somewhat stiff and not too long/bendy/fluffy, and will work well with creams (synthetics are best for that).

For placement as a bronzer, imagine the areas of the face that look darker when you’ve been out in the sun… Under the cheekbones, and even on and around them, a little along the temples and forehead/hairline, and maybe even on your neck and chest (my personal favorite if I’m showing off some skin in that area).

As Contour:   You can use the same brushes, just don’t buff out as much so you have a more defined line! I also recommend NOT using this around the nose as a contour because using a warm toned shade in that area that tends to look very unnatural!

As far as placement goes for a contour, you’ll want to apply this just under your cheekbones (not too far forward, though), temples, and around the hairline and jawline.

For both a bronzing and contouring application, a Beauty Blender also works VERY well so blend this stick out, especially if you want a more natural look!

 

*** This post expresses my own honest opinion. I purchased this out of pocket and did not receive any type of PR or compensation for this review ***

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I’ve been a big fan of Benefit’s original Hoola Matte Bronzer for years, but I always had trouble wearing it unless I had a tan. Needless to say, once I discovered that they released Hoola Lite, I rushed to Ulta to pick it up! In MAC terms, I’m NC25-30 as of last week (thanks to Versaspa), while I’m normally NC10-15. Having such a fair complexion makes it SUPER difficult for me to find a light bronzer that’s matte and doesn’t run too warm toned. So for all of you fair to light babes out there, this bronzer is a must have for spring and summer!

Hoola Lite is new to Benefit’s permanent lineup and is available at Ulta, Sephora, Macy’s, and of course www.benefitcosmetics.com. It sells for $29 and contains 8 g / 0.28 oz of product. If you’d rather get a little more bang for your buck, you can get this bronzer in Benefit’s Cheek Parade palette which, in addition to Hoola Lite, contains the original Hoola Matte Bronzer as well as Dandelion, Rockateur, and Galifornia blushes. The awesome thing about the Cheek Parade palette is that ALL of the products in there are full size! It sells for $58, so you’re saving $87! I may have to go pick that up next week… If I do, I’ll be sure to post it on here for all of you to check out. This is a cruelty-free product and Benefit Cosmetics does not test on animals ❤

If you’d like to get updates on posts are coming up, stay in touch with me, and get sneak peeks of new products that I’ll be testing and reviewing, be sure to follow me on twitterinstagram, and snapchat, all @ lesley_makeup!

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Hoola Lite comes in a little square box with a flip-top lid that contains a small mirror. I know it’s not the most luxurious packaging ever, but I do like the fact that it’s something that doesn’t weigh a ton and isn’t going to raise the price of the product. Honestly, this bronzer speaks for itself so it doesn’t even need crazy, fancy packaging. And don’t worry, the box has a magnetic feature to keep the lid closed so it won’t open up and make a mess in your makeup bag! It comes with a flat, square-ish brush which can be used to get a pretty defined line if you’re contouring with this but it does feel a little rough, so I recommend just using whatever brushes you already have! I’ll recommend a few in the application section below.

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Photo taken outdoors in indirect sunlight on NC20 skin             Left: Hoola Lite             Right Hoola

***     I will try to post new swatches ASAP! It’s very overcast and stormy today so this photo didn’t turn out how I wanted it to     ***

This bronzer is described as a “natural light bronze”. It’s a pretty light cocoa color with slightly warm undertones and a matte finish. The texture feels very smooth and almost buttery. You may notice a little bit of powdery fluff when you dip your brush into the bronzer but there’s no fallout once applied. The color payoff is great but depending on your skin’s natural undertone, this may look a little warmer or cooler once you put it on. That’s not a bad thing, though, and this bronzer is universally flattering on warm, neutral, and cool skintones. Coverage is easily made full and opaque if you want to apply it that way (I often use it as an eye shadow in my crease). If you don’t want too much definition, it can also be applied lightly and blends out very easily so you don’t get a harsh line. Hoola Lite wears well on me all day long… I didn’t notice any fading until I had it on for 10-12 hours, and that’s with the weather being pretty warm and humid lately, so I’m impressed!

Dupes:   Obviously it’s much lighter than Benefit’s original Hoola! It’s lighter and a bit warmer toned than Sombre from Kat Von D’s Shade + Light Contour Palette. Compared to MAC’s Sculpt Powders (from MAC PRO), it has a more golden tone than Bone Beige. While I couldn’t find an actual bronzer very similar to this, Hoola Lite does seem to fall right in between MAC’s Mineralize Skinfinish Natural Powders in Medium Golden, which is a little less golden/yellow toned, and Medium Tan, which is slightly darker and more tan/warm toned. The texture of those is also incredibly similar to Hoola Lite.

Overall Rating:   4.7 / 5

Application:   5

Coverage:  5

Color Payoff:   5

Texture:   5

Wear Time:   4

Packaging:   4

Application:

As Bronzer:   When applying this as a bronzer, you’ll want to use a fluffy, tapered brush. A few of my favorites are MAC’s 138 Tapered Face Brush, which is the best bronzer brush EVER, and 135 Large Flat Powder Brush used sideways to hug the curves of the face. I also really like Sephora’s #55 Pro Airbrush, Real Techniques Blush Brush (pink handle), and I just started using Morphe’s R1 Deluxe Pointed Powder Brush (same thing as their other types of “pointed powder” brushes).

You’ll want to follow the natural curves of the face, sort of in the areas where you would normally contour, except the nose, but by using a larger, fluffier brush, it will differ the product leaving you with a subtle, sun kissed look! The areas you’ll want to concentrate on are below the cheekbone, the temples and lightly around your hairline, and the jawline. I also put a bit on my neck and above/below my collarbone if I’m wearing a top that shows that area.

As Contour:   If you’re using Hoola Lite to contour with, you’ll need a more dense, smaller type of brush for a more precise application. The brush it comes with actually works alright for the cheekbones, temples, and jawline, but my favorite brushes are MAC’s 109 Small Contour Brush and 168 Large Angled Contour Brush, Real Techniques Contour Brush (yellow/gold handle), Zoeva’s 110 Face Shaper Brush, and Morphe’s R13 Pointed Contour Brush (same thing as their other Pointed Contour Brushes). While this is usable as a face contour, it isn’t the classic, more cool toned type of contour and I suggest avoiding using this on the nose. Using warmer tones in that area tends to look a bit unnatural on most people.

To apply as a contour, you’ll want to use a light hand, gradually building up the product. I like to start at the back of the area right below my cheekbone and blend it forward so the most concentrated amount of color is closest to my ear. Then you can hit the other areas of the face like your temples, jawline, and hairline.

*** This post expresses my own honest opinion. I purchased this out of pocket and did not receive any type of PR or compensation for this review ***

Since I can’t resist a new highlighter (and who can, right?!), I purchased these during the first launch and have been testing them for quite a while now. I promise you that if you didn’t get these the first time, it will be worth the wait when the restock goes live. If you’re a highlighter addict like me, you will absolutely fall in love with these!

So without further ado, I give you Skin Frosts!

*** If you would like to check out my post for Siberian Gold Skin Frost, please click here ***

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Ice Cold, Peach Goddess, King Tut

The Skin Frost formula is very finely milled and has a buttery sort of texture to it, so they blend out and build up easily. They do vary with color payoff and such, but I’ll cover that in the individual reviews. I would describe the feel of these to be a cross between Becca’s Pressed Shimmering Skin Perfector and the highlighters in Anastasia’s Glow Kits. I also love how the logo is stamped into the product, and surprisingly, it doesn’t seem to fade very quickly, even with frequent use.

They all apply best with a small-ish, preferably tapered, somewhat dense, fluffy brush like Anastasia’s A23, Real Techniques Setting Brush (the one with the pink handle), or MAC’s 133 Brush. Used dry, they give you anything from a light, subtle glow up to something more intense, depending on how much you apply and layer the Skin Frost. Another way to get a softer, more natural highlight is to use a dry, fluffy fan brush like a MAC 184 (from MAC Pro or online). Fan brushes will actually provide the widest range for levels of color payoff and coverage, depending on how much product you get on them and whether or not you use it dry or damp.

If you want that mega glowing, almost metallic, goddess-from-another-planet type of highlight, you can spray your brush with something like MAC’s Fix + Spray AFTER swiping your brush through the highlighter and picking up a good amount of product… If you spray your brush first, your brush may be too damp and you can end up with that icky crusty buildup on your highlighter that will make it difficult to use later on. That’s not something unique to these highlighters though, it will happen with any type of powder that you use a wet brush with.

Pro Tip: You can multitask with these! Need an inner corner highlight for your eyes? Pop on the same Skin Frost you used on your cheeks! I use these as eye shadows all the time and I’ll even pop a little bit onto the center of my lips after applying lipstick for a glowy pout without using a gloss.

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All of these are available on the Jeffree Star Cosmetics website and they sell for $29 each. They contain 15g / 0.53oz of product, so they’re absolutely massive and a really good value… In comparison, the Becca Shimmering Skin Perfector’s contain 8g / 0.28oz of powder and go for $38, while the Laura Gellar Baked Gelato Swirl Illuminator’s contain 4.5g / 0.16oz and sell for $26. The closest high end highlighter, value wise, is MAC’s Mineralize Skinfinish, which contains 10g / .35oz and costs $32.

The Skin Frosts are all out of stock as of right now (end of July), but according to Jeffree’s Instagram, there will be a restock of Peach Goddess and King Tut on Thursday, August 11th at 10am PST, and four new shades will also be launching at that time… There’s another shade, Mint Condition, that I did not purchase, so I’m sorry but that one won’t be in this review. I hope to get it eventually, and I’ll be sure to post it when I do!

In addition to these being huge and a great value, the packaging is also really nice. It’s made from a sturdy, bright pink plastic and has a mirror inside that’s the full size of the compact! On the outside, the logo is printed on the lid in a very pretty, metallic pink that looks super cute and classy. Luckily, I haven’t dropped one of these yet, but I’m assuming that due to the soft formula, the powder could potentially be fragile, but that’s how it is with most highlighters. One thing I noticed, and appreciated, is how quickly my order processed and shipped, and how thorough they were with their packaging… These highlighters were wrapped in SO much pink bubble wrap and tissue paper, I think the apocalypse could have happened and my skin frosts still would have survived!

Now for the individual reviews!

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Ice Cold

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Ice Cold


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Ice Cold


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Ice Cold – Swatch taken outdoors in natural sunlight on NC25-ish skin

Ice Cold:   This Skin Frost is a light creamy color with a warmer type of golden undertone. On me, this is the one that glows the most without having to apply much. However, my skintone ranges from a MAC NC15 to NC25/C3.5 depending on how much my spray tan has faded haha. I feel like this is a shade that so many fair to light beauties have been praying to the makeup gods for. It’s so well pigmented without looking too light once applied, so it makes for the absolute most PERFECT highlight that gives you a beautiful, ethereal glow! Another great thing about this shade is that it’s so neutral that it compliments any blush that you’re using, whether it’s a cool toned pink, or a warmer peach or coral, so it’s something that’s definitely wearable every day.

As I mentioned earlier, Skin Frosts have a very buttery texture and glide right onto the skin with little to no blending required when using the proper brush (the ones I suggested are the best I’ve found, and trust me, I have a billion brushes). Coverage and color payoff are fantastic, but the fluffier the brush, the less you’ll get of either. I find that to be a good thing though, because it makes it easy to customize your level of glow. Wear time seems to be pretty much all day… These don’t fade easily or quickly unless you’re out in some serious heat and humidity, but the rest of your makeup is probably melting off at that point anyway! If I apply a Skin Frost around noon, it’s still there by midnight. With Ice Cold, it can begin to fade about 6 hours after I’ve applied it, but only a little, and it actually ends up looking prettier because it just melts right into the skin, giving the glow a softer, sexier, more magical appearance.

Overall Rating:   5 / 5

Application:   5

Coverage:  5

Color Payoff:   5

Texture:   5

Wear Time:   5

Packaging:   5

Dupes:   MAC’s Lightscapade Mineralize Skinfinish is very close, but has a cooler, more pastel undertone and not as much pigmentation. Becca’s Pressed Shimmering Skin Perfector in Moonstone has the same type of warm, golden tone, but is a little bit darker. The Balm’s Mary-Lou Manizer also has the same undertone, but is darker than both Moonstone and Ice Cold. Becca’s Opal is darker and has more of a pink undertone… So I think it’s safe to say that Ice Cold is very unique!

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Peach Goddess

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Peach Goddess


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Peach Goddess


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Peach Goddess – Swatch taken outdoors in natural sunlight on NC25-ish skin

Peach Goddess:   Peach Goddess is a medium, peachy pink with warm undertones. When I’m more tan, this can be subtle if I apply it lightly, but it also looks amazing applied more heavily because it gives a super pretty, warm glow to light/medium to darker skin tones. While I feel like this shade isn’t quite as pigmented as Ice Cold or King Tut, it could also be because once it’s on the skin, it’s more of a warm neutral, even though it looks pretty bold and rosy in the compact itself. I definitely get better color payoff with Peach Goddess when I use a more dense brush (the Real Techniques Shading Brush is my favorite for this shade), and/or use a damp application technique.

Peach Goddess has the same texture as the other Skin Frosts, so it’s a very creamy feeling powder that applies easily. As I said though, the color payoff and coverage may take a heavier or damp application or more layering with this shade. Like Ice Cold, this shade looks beautiful all day with minimal fading… All of that said, when I’m more tan, I tend to reach for Peach Goddess more than any other highlighter because it looks so good with the warmer toned blushes I use during summer! Even if I don’t wear much makeup, this is easy to pop on as a highlight and eye shadow to give my face a little bit more life.

Overall Rating:   4.8 / 5

Application:   5

Coverage:  5

Color Payoff:   4

Texture:   5

Wear Time:   5

Packaging:   5

Dupes:   In the pan, MAC’s Mineralize Skinfinish in Cheeky Bronze looks very similar, but the texture feels different and it’s not quite as glowy, even if the color is close. Global Glow MSF is darker and less pink, and has some thicker gold shimmer particles in it. MAC’s Soft & Gentle MSF is pretty close, but a little lighter and less rosy toned. Becca’s Champagne Pop is lighter and peachier, while Opal is lighter and has a more golden undertone. Laura Geller’s Baked Gelato Swirl Illuminator in Peach Glow is the closest dupe I’ve found, but it’s the tiniest big lighter, even though the general color and undertone are very much alike.

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King Tut

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King Tut


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King Tut


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King Tut – Swatch taken outside in natural sunlight on NC25-ish skin

King Tut:   King Tut is a stunning golden color fit for a queen and has subtle warm undertones that are a true golden bronze, rather than a pink or reddish type of undertone found in a lot of deeper shades of highlighters. Even though King Tut looks quite dark in the compact, it blends out without looking too intense, even on lighter skintones. I managed to pull this off as an NC15, and I’ve seen NW/NC50+ rocking this highlighter too, so I would say this is the most versatile of the three Skin Frosts I purchased.

I’m happy to say that the super smooth texture is the same with all of the Skin Frosts. It’s nice to have so much consistency in a product! As far as color payoff and coverage go, like I said, King Tut is the most versatile of the three shades and can be applied and blended out lightly, or really built up to look just like it does in the pan. This shade wore well on me for a solid 8 hours before I noticed any fading, probably because it’s so pigmented, but when it does begin to fade it’s like the others and still gives you a glow, but becomes slightly softer. Now just wait till you get to the dupes… I know some of you diehard MAC fans are going to be VERY happy 😉

Overall Rating:   5 / 5

Application:   5

Coverage:  5

Color Payoff:   5

Texture:   5

Wear Time:   5

Packaging:   5

Dupes:   Okay so this is the best part… When applied lightly to moderately, King Tut looks a LOT like MAC’s Whisper of Gilt Extra Dimension Skinfinish that was limited edition! Whisper of Gilt is just a little lighter, but they’re SUPER close. Another Extra Dimension Skinfinish that’s even more similar to King Tut is Oh Darling, which was limited edition and released during the 2015 holiday season. MAC’s Global Glow Mineralize Skinfinish is a little deeper bronze toned and has bigger shimmer particles, but it’s the closest dupe I can find that’s permanent… Of course, being quite pale most of the time, I don’t personally have many golden toned highlighters to sit here and compare King Tut to, so if you know of any awesome dupes, feel free to post them in the comments below!

Mac’s new Flamingo Park collection for Spring 2016 is full of bright pinks and corals to brighten things up since winter will hopefully be coming to an end soon! This is a sneak peek of all the upcoming posts I’ll be making about this collection through Sunday…

Enjoy and thanks for reading!

Note: I will also be reviewing the Beauty Powders, but I still need to photograph them.

 

 

Blush:

Let’s Be Friends – Life’s A Picnic – Oh, My!

Spring Flock – This Could Be Fun – What I Fancy

(Pink Swoon is permanent so I did not purchase or review that one)

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Lipstick:

Be Silly, Have Your Cake, Flocking Fabulous, Long Legged & Fabulous, Nice To Meet You, Please Me, Saint Germain, Silly, The Fashion Flock

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Cremesheen Glass:

Look Who’s Here, Petite Indulgence, Playful Petal, Such Sweeties, Sweet Tooth

(from top to bottom)

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Lip Pencils:

Chic Trick, Embrace Me, In Synch

(better photos will be in the blog post)

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I figured it’s about time to update the posts for these palettes. I made the original post back when these were released for PRO only, but things have changed since then! The product is still the same, but it’s been available at MAC stores and has been part of the permanent Studio line for some time now. My apologies that these are a bit ugly and used… These are the second round of palettes that I’ve purchased, so they’re pretty new, but they’ve have been put to work in my kit… I had to redo the photos because I have a MUCH better lighting set up and know how to use my camera better now, so these are a more accurate representation of the colors!

Originally, these were designed with the professional makeup artist’s need in mind and released through MAC PRO only, but they’re great to have for personal use as well. Since there are a variety of colors in each palette, it makes it easy to find the right match, either by using them individually or by combining them to create the perfect color. For personal use, these are nice to have because so many people have fluctuations in their skintone between seasons, so you will never run into the “oh no my concealer is too dark/light” dilemma! You can also use these to contour and highlight with if you prefer creams.

The Studio Conceal and Correct palettes are the same size as the Pro Lip Palettes and eye shadow quad palettes. They fit easily into any makeup kit or travel bag and contain a total of 6g / 0.21oz of product… That’s 1g per concealer/corrector, as opposed to the 7g / 0.24oz you get in an individual Studio Finish Concealer. PRO Conceal and Correct Palettes sell for $40. That may or may not seem like a great value to an everyday consumer, but for us professional makeup artists, these are worth every penny due to the convenience factor! These are eligible for the MAC PRO discount as well. You can purchase these at any MAC store or online at www.maccosmetics.com.

Medium Deep Conceal and Correct 1

Studio Finish Concealers are SPF35 and packed with nourishing antioxidants. They are highly pigmented and have a creamy consistency that is easily blendable. While they’re suitable for all skin types, if you have a dry under eye area, just make sure to use a lightweight eye cream before you apply your concealer (usually 30 minutes or so prior to doing your makeup)… That will prevent it from looking too dry or emphasizing lines. When I apply concealers or correctors, I like to put on my primer, then put on my foundation, THEN concealer… I know a lot of you may do concealer, then foundation, which is fine too, but you’ll actually use less concealer or corrector if you do it AFTER foundation! This is because when you apply foundation over your concealer, you may be wiping it away or thinning it out, giving you less coverage. If you wanna give it a shot applying your foundation, then concealer/corrector, just be sure to use your foundation brush with whatever product is leftover on there, or beauty blender sponge, gently patting over the concealer after you put it on to blend it in!

You can apply these with natural to full coverage, depending on what type of brush you use. For heavier coverage, you can use a flat concealer brush like a MAC 193, 194, or 195 brush, or a MAC 287 duo-fibre brush… For a lighter application or for more blendability, you can use a fluffier brush like a MAC 217, 222, 224, or my favorite, the 286 duo-fibre brush.

There are four concealers in each palette and two correctors at the bottom. The correctors are made to counteract redness (yellow toned) and to brighten dark areas, like under the eyes, around the nose/mouth, and any scars or spots from blemishes (peach/orange tone).

These wear best when they are set with some type of powder after application… I like using a translucent or transparent finishing powder, such as MAC’s Prep + Prime Transparent Finishing Powder or MAC Set Powder in Invisible. When set like this, I get at least 8 hours of wear before any fading or movement occurs.

For a brief explanation of how MAC names/codes their products:

W = Warm (typically more pinkish undertones)

NW = Neutral Warm (beige mixed with pink/salmon or red undertones)

N = Neutral (very neutral beige with no apparent pink or yellow tones)

NC = Neutral Cool (beige mixed with yellow/olive undertones)

C = Cool (yellow to olive undertones)

Medium Deep Conceal and Correct Label

Medium Deep Conceal and Correct 2

Photo taken outdoors in natural sunlight. Concealers and Correctors swatched on NC15 skin.

Photo taken outdoors in natural sunlight.
Concealers and Correctors swatched on NC15 skin.

Overall Rating:   4.8 / 5

Application:   5

Coverage:  5

Color Payoff:   5

Texture:   5

Wear Time:   4

Packaging:   5

NC40

NC40

NC40:   NC40 is a medium, almost peachy beige with neutral undertones… In the swatch photo, it looks warm, but it’s only because I’m so fair! It actually has cooler-neutral tones on deeper skin tones. It works well to conceal on the face, as well as correct and highlight with, since it’s pretty neutral and doesn’t tend to lean too orange. This concealer can be purchased individually if it’s the only one you need.

NW40

NW40

NW40:   This concealer is a medium-dark, warm beige/brown with orange undertones. I typically use this on dark to deep skin tones to brighten and correct under the eye and around the mouth and nose, if necessary. You can use this to highlight on the face, too. NW40 is also available in the NW40/NC45 Studio Finish Concealer Duo, as well as on its own.

NC42

NC42

NC42:   NC42 is a medium dark, cool toned beige with almost peachy/orange undertones… It looks different on warm or cool skin tones, and I’m so fair that the swatch actually looks a little warmer on me than on most people. Since this color is fairly neutral, it can be used for both under eye correction as well as concealing or highlighting on the face. NC42 can also be bought by itself if you don’t need the entire palette.

NW43

NW43

NW43:   NW43 is a dark, warm brown with somewhat reddish/salmon undertones. It works very well for counteracting dark areas under the eye and around the mouth/nose, as well as any dark spots from blemishes or scarring. You may also use this to highlight with, or to conceal blemishes with if you have about the same skin tone. Even though this is a darker color, it may be too warm for a contour on a lot of people… If you have a medium-dark skin tone, you can try it as a cream bronzer, though! NW43 can be purchased on it’s own but is not part of any of the concealer duos.

Rich Yellow

Rich Yellow

Rich Yellow:   Rich Yellow is a medium , cool yellow and is the corrector color in the palette that’s best for correcting redness, or you can mix it with other concealers to cool them down a bit. You can also mix this with concealers to create a new color for highlighting… Due to the fact that it’s so cool toned and yellow, I don’t necessarily recommend using this under the eyes by itself anyway, because it can make you look a little washed out. Rich Yellow is only available in this palette.

Burnt Coral

Burnt Coral

Burnt Coral:   Burnt Coral is a medium dark, rich, warm toned orange/coral. A corrector like this is awesome at counteracting dark circles under the eyes, as well as any dark spots on the face. However, you don’t just want to put this on without another concealer or at least a bit of your foundation over it… The point of correctors like this is to counteract, but they’ll look a little funky without something similar or lighter than your skin tone blended over them! It’s not necessarily great for highlighting, because it’s so pigmented and orange, but you can mix it with other concealers to warm them up for the purpose of highlighting. Burnt Coral can be purchased in a refill pan from MAC PRO stores or on their website, which fit into the palettes that most people use for eye shadows (you can get those in 2, 4, or 15 pan).

I figured it’s about time to update the posts for these palettes. I made the original post back when these were released for PRO only, but things have changed since then! The product is still the same, but it’s been available at MAC stores and has been part of the permanent Studio line for some time now. My apologies that these are a bit ugly and used… These are the second round of palettes that I’ve purchased, so they’re pretty new, but they’ve have been put to work in my kit… I had to redo the photos because I have a MUCH better lighting set up and know how to use my camera better now, so these are a more accurate representation of the colors!

Originally, these were designed with the professional makeup artist’s need in mind and released through MAC PRO only, but they’re great to have for personal use as well. Since there are a variety of colors in each palette, it makes it easy to find the right match, either by using them individually or by combining them to create the perfect color. For personal use, these are nice to have because so many people have fluctuations in their skintone between seasons, so you will never run into the “oh no my concealer is too dark/light” dilemma! You can also use these to contour and highlight with if you prefer creams.

The Studio Conceal and Correct palettes are the same size as the Pro Lip Palettes and eye shadow quad palettes. They fit easily into any makeup kit or travel bag and contain a total of 6g / 0.21oz of product… That’s 1g per concealer/corrector, as opposed to the 7g / 0.24oz you get in an individual Studio Finish Concealer. PRO Conceal and Correct Palettes sell for $40. That may or may not seem like a great value to an everyday consumer, but for us professional makeup artists, these are worth every penny due to the convenience factor! These are eligible for the MAC PRO discount as well. You can purchase these at any MAC store or online at www.maccosmetics.com.

Conceal and Correct Palette Medium 1

Studio Finish Concealers are SPF35 and packed with nourishing antioxidants. They are highly pigmented and have a creamy consistency that is easily blendable. While they’re suitable for all skin types, if you have a dry under eye area, just make sure to use a lightweight eye cream before you apply your concealer (usually 30 minutes or so prior to doing your makeup)… That will prevent it from looking too dry or emphasizing lines. When I apply concealers or correctors, I like to put on my primer, then put on my foundation, THEN concealer… I know a lot of you may do concealer, then foundation, which is fine too, but you’ll actually use less concealer or corrector if you do it AFTER foundation! This is because when you apply foundation over your concealer, you may be wiping it away or thinning it out, giving you less coverage. If you wanna give it a shot applying your foundation, then concealer/corrector, just be sure to use your foundation brush with whatever product is leftover on there, or beauty blender sponge, gently patting over the concealer after you put it on to blend it in!

You can apply these with natural to full coverage, depending on what type of brush you use. For heavier coverage, you can use a flat concealer brush like a MAC 193, 194, or 195 brush, or a MAC 287 duo-fibre brush… For a lighter application or for more blendability, you can use a fluffier brush like a MAC 217, 222, 224, or my favorite, the 286 duo-fibre brush.

There are four concealers in each palette and two correctors at the bottom. The correctors are made to counteract redness (yellow toned) and to brighten dark areas, like under the eyes, around the nose/mouth, and any scars or spots from blemishes (peach/orange tone).

These wear best when they are set with some type of powder after application… I like using a translucent or transparent finishing powder, such as MAC’s Prep + Prime Transparent Finishing Powder or MAC Set Powder in Invisible. When set like this, I get at least 8 hours of wear before any fading or movement occurs.

For a brief explanation of how MAC names/codes their products:

W = Warm (typically more pinkish undertones)

NW = Neutral Warm (beige mixed with pink/salmon or red undertones)

N = Neutral (very neutral beige with no apparent pink or yellow tones)

NC = Neutral Cool (beige mixed with yellow/olive undertones)

C = Cool (yellow to olive undertones)

Medium palette Label

Medium Palette 2

Photo taken outdoors in natural sunlight. Concealers and Correctors swatched on NC15 skin.

Photo taken outdoors in natural sunlight.
Concealers and Correctors swatched on NC15 skin.

Overall Rating:   4.8 / 5

Application:   5

Coverage:  5

Color Payoff:   5

Texture:   5

Wear Time:   4

Packaging:   5

NC30

NC30

NC30:   This concealer is a light-medium, cool beige with yellow undertones. Since it’s not super yellowish, it can be used to conceal on the face and highlight with, or to brighten the under eye area. NC30 can be purchased individually, as well as in the NW25/NC30 Studio Finish Concealer Duo.

NW25

NW25

NW25:   This concealer is a light, warm, creamy beige with strong peachy-pink undertones. I most frequently use this to correct dark circles under the eyes, though it can also be used as a highlighter. You can also buy NW25 by itself, or pick it up in the NW25/NC30 Studio Finish Concealer Palette.

NC35

NC35

NC35:   NC35 is a medium, slightly cool toned beige and works well to correct redness or blemishes on the face, as well as works as a highlighter. On some people, this may look good as a corrector/brightener under the eyes too, but you have to be careful when you get into cooler tones… NC35 is not quite so yellow as some of the other NC shades are, though. If you’re fair like I am, you can even use this as a subtle cream bronzer. You can get NC35 individually or in the NW30/NC35 Studio Finish Concealer Duo.

NW35

NW35

NW35:   This concealer is a medium to medium-dark, warm, brownish-beige with peachy/orange undertones. NW35 can be used on the face to conceal or used as a corrector for dark areas, like under the eyes and around the mouth and nose. Like NC35, it can also be used as a cream bronzer on fair/light skin tones if you prefer a warmer toned bronze. NW35 can be purchased by itself.

Mid-Yellow

Mid-Yellow

Mid-Yellow:   Mid-Yellow is one of the correctors in this palette… It’s a light-medium, cool toned yellow. Colors like this are best for correcting redness, but can also be mixed and layered with other concealers to highlight other areas with. Mid-Yellow is available exclusively in this palette.

Mid-Peach

Mid-Peach

Mid-Peach:   This corrector is a light-medium peach with warm undertones. I love using this to correct dark circles and other dark areas on the face. It can also be mixed with other concealers to warm them up to use for concealing or highlighting. Mid-Peach is only available in this palette.

I figured it’s about time to update the posts for these palettes. I made the original post back when these were released for PRO only, but things have changed since then! The product is still the same, but it’s been available at MAC stores and has been part of the permanent Studio line for some time now. My apologies that these are a bit ugly and used… These are the second round of palettes that I’ve purchased, so they’re pretty new, but they’ve have been put to work in my kit… I had to redo the photos because I have a MUCH better lighting set up and know how to use my camera better now, so these are a more accurate representation of the colors!

Originally, these were designed with the professional makeup artist’s need in mind and released through MAC PRO only, but they’re great to have for personal use as well. Since there are a variety of colors in each palette, it makes it easy to find the right match, either by using them individually or by combining them to create the perfect color. For personal use, these are nice to have because so many people have fluctuations in their skintone between seasons, so you will never run into the “oh no my concealer is too dark/light” dilemma! You can also use these to contour and highlight with if you prefer creams, though Light doesn’t really have any colors dark enough to use as a contour… The other three do, though!

The Studio Conceal and Correct palettes are the same size as the Pro Lip Palettes and eye shadow quad palettes. They fit easily into any makeup kit or travel bag and contain a total of 6g / 0.21oz of product… That’s 1g per concealer/corrector, as opposed to the 7g / 0.24oz you get in an individual Studio Finish Concealer. PRO Conceal and Correct Palettes sell for $40. That may or may not seem like a great value to an everyday consumer, but for us professional makeup artists, these are worth every penny due to the convenience factor! These are eligible for the MAC PRO discount as well. You can purchase these at any MAC store or online at www.maccosmetics.com.

ConcealerPaletteLight1

Studio Finish Concealers are SPF35 and packed with nourishing antioxidants. They are highly pigmented and have a creamy consistency that is easily blendable. While they’re suitable for all skin types, if you have a dry under eye area, just make sure to use a lightweight eye cream before you apply your concealer (usually 30 minutes or so prior to doing your makeup)… That will prevent it from looking too dry or emphasizing lines. When I apply concealers or correctors, I like to put on my primer, then put on my foundation, THEN concealer… I know a lot of you may do concealer, then foundation, which is fine too, but you’ll actually use less concealer or corrector if you do it AFTER foundation! This is because when you apply foundation over your concealer, you may be wiping it away or thinning it out, giving you less coverage. If you wanna give it a shot applying your foundation, then concealer/corrector, just be sure to use your foundation brush with whatever product is leftover on there, or beauty blender sponge, gently patting over the concealer after you put it on to blend it in!

You can apply these with natural to full coverage, depending on what type of brush you use. For heavier coverage, you can use a flat concealer brush like a MAC 193, 194, or 195 brush, or a MAC 287 duo-fibre brush… For a lighter application or for more blendability, you can use a fluffier brush like a MAC 217, 222, 224, or my favorite, the 286 duo-fibre brush.

There are four concealers in each palette and two correctors at the bottom. The correctors are made to counteract redness (yellow toned) and to brighten dark areas, like under the eyes, around the nose/mouth, and any scars or spots from blemishes (peach/orange tone).

These wear best when they are set with some type of powder after application… I like using a translucent or transparent finishing powder, such as MAC’s Prep + Prime Transparent Finishing Powder or MAC Set Powder in Invisible. When set like this, I get at least 8 hours of wear before any fading or movement occurs.

For a brief explanation of how MAC names/codes their products:

W = Warm (typically more pinkish undertones)

NW = Neutral Warm (beige mixed with pink/salmon or red undertones)

N = Neutral (very neutral beige with no apparent pink or yellow tones)

NC = Neutral Cool (beige mixed with yellow/olive undertones)

C = Cool (yellow to olive undertones)

Pro Conceal and Correct Palette Light - Label

Light Palette 2

Photo taken outdoors in natural sunlight. Concealers and Correctors swatched on NC15 skin.

Photo taken outdoors in natural sunlight.
Concealers and Correctors swatched on NC15 skin.

Overall Rating:   4.8 / 5

Application:   5

Coverage:  5

Color Payoff:   5

Texture:   5

Wear Time:   4

Packaging:   5

NC15

NC15

NC15:   This is the lightest of the NC (Neutral Cool) concealers from MAC. It’s a pale, ivory beige with yellow undertones that is a good match for fair-light, cool skintones. For the most part, I like to use this to cover blemishes, as it helps neutralize redness, but you can also use this as a highlighter and to brighten the under eye area if you prefer a cooler toned concealer over the usual warm tones most people use to correct dark circles. That said, it can be layered over another color, just to brighten. NC15 is available to purchase individually in both refill pans and in the usual Studio Finish concealer packaging.

W10

W10

W10:   This is a sort of new shade of Studio Finish Concealer… It’s a pale, creamy ivory with warm, pinkish undertone. If you’re very fair and have a warmer skin tone (NW or Matchmaster 1-1.5), you can use this on the face to correct. I personally love this color to brighten and highlight under my eyes. It’s just warm enough to cover my dark circles perfectly! This color is only available in this palette and in the W10/NC20 Studio Finish Concealer Duo.

NC20

NC20

NC20:   NC20 is a light beige with yellow undertones. This can be used to correct on the face if you have a similar skin tone, or to counteract redness. You can also highlight with this concealer. This color is also available in the W10/NC20 Studio Finish Concealer Duo and can be purchased by itself.

NW20

NW20

NW20:   This concealer is a light, warm, ivory/beige with peachy pink undertones. This type of color is ideal to correct and brighten under the eyes for anyone who has a fair to light complexion. It can also be used to conceal on the face if you have warmer undertones to your skin. NW20 is available individually, as well as in the NW20/NC25 Studio Finish Concealer Duo.

Pale Yellow

Pale Yellow

Pale Yellow:   Pale Yellow is one of the corrector colors in this palette and is, well, a pale, creamy , cool toned yellow. It’s mostly meant to be used as a corrector for redness, but can be mixed with other colors to highlight with, too. This also works for some people under the eyes, though not most because the cooler tone can make you look a little washed out. This corrector is only available in this palette.

Pale Pink

Pale Pink

Pale Pink:   This corrector is a pale, warm, pinky peach that’s best for correcting dark circles and other dark, cool toned discolorations. I use this quite often under my eyes if I don’t want to use something as light as W10. Most of the time when I use Pale Pink, I layer another concealer or I’ll pat my foundation over it so you don’t actually see this color (the whole point of correctors). This corrector is only available in this palette.