Archive

Tag Archives: Glitter

It’s that time of year again… You know, the time when there are all kinds of gorgeous holiday sets out that you can’t resist?! Well, this might be one that you CAN resist if you aren’t into metallic or glittery things. Personally, I don’t like actual glitter all that much, so this seemed like a good way for me to try these shadows without dropping $24 on one individual shade. Between the two formulas, you can create several different looks and get a feel for Stila’s liquid shadows, so it’s definitely worth picking up if you want something new and sparkly to play around with, especially for the holidays!

If you’d like to keep up with me and check out any new makeup I’m playing around with, you can follow me on Instagram, Twitter, and Snapchat, all of which are lesley_makeup. I love staying in touch with my readers, so don’t be afraid to hit me up on there if you have a product question or just want to say hi!

SONY DSC

Left to Right:   Shimmer & Glow – Kitten, Grace, Twig   |   Glitter & Glow – Peachy Sheen, Smoldering Satin, Next to Notte

The packaging is cute and gives of very holiday-ish vibes, so you could just pop this into someone’s stocking without even wrapping it… Like I probably will because I am shamelessly lazy. The ingredients for each shadow are listed on the back of the box and also on Stila’s website. All of these shadows have the same type of flat, yet soft and flexible, paddle-shaped doe foot applicator. It’s small enough that you can get a precise application without making a glittery mess, but still big enough that you don’t have to dip it into the tube over and over again to get out enough product to cover your entire lid (with most shades, anyway).

There’s also a caution/warning on the box regarding eye irritation. When I tried one of these a while back I think it may have made my eyelid a little red and itchy, but I also tried it with a new base, so I can’t say which caused the irritation. I haven’t had any bad reactions with any from this set so far. Do be careful with the Glitter & Glow shadows, though, especially if you wear contact lenses. Getting the little glitter particles in your eye can be absolute torture! The best way to avoid this is to gently pat these onto the eyelid and build up the product if needed, rather than slapping a ton of product on at once, then trying to blend it out because that’s when you’ll get issues with fallout. Even with a perfect application, the Glitter & Glow shadows did have some fallout but most of it fell onto my cheeks or lashes and didn’t get into my actual eyes.

SONY DSC

SONY DSC

There are two different formulas in this set. One is the Glitter & Glow formula, which some of you may already be familiar with… According to Stila, this is a “dazzling, ultra-sparkle finish”. It’s pretty glittery but the pigmentation and coverage varies between each shadow. For the most part, these perform well and are comfortable to wear. The other formula in this set is their new Shimmer & Glow liquid eye shadow, which Stila describes as a “high shimmer, non-glitter shadow”. They’re more highly pigmented and metallic and do not contain any glitter. I like these because you can blend them out if you want a softer, more subtle type of sheen, or you can just wear them with their full opacity in all of their metallic, shiny glory.

There are three liquid shadows in each formula in this set for a total of six. There’s not a ton of variation in colors but every one of these is wearable for any skin tone. All of the shadows in this set are available to purchase separately and full sized, except for Peachy Sheen, which seems to be limited to this set… Not that it matters, because Peachy Sheen is honestly garbage and not worth being offered individually. As far as I know, the Shimmer & Glow shadows are not yet available to purchase in stores but you can get them from Ulta’s website. According to the Ulta website, the Shimmer & Glow shadows will be in stores on January 4th.

This set sells for $45 and contains 0.07 fl. oz / 2.25 ml of product in each liquid shadow, which makes this a $72 value (according to the Sephora and Stila websites, anyway). You can purchase these from Sephora or the Stila website.  If you are visiting the Stila website for first time from your phone, iPad, or another browser, it will offer you a 20% off code if you sign up for their updates and newsletter, but you can always use the code and unsubscribe from the emails! There aren’t really any other shadows that I’ve used that I can compare these to, but I do think this set is a decent value. Also, keep in mind that this set IS limited edition, so if you’re wanting to save some money and try these out without buying the full size versions, pick this up while you can!

Stila is a cruelty-free company, by the way 😉

Note: I’m not posting dupes for these just yet, as I haven’t tried any other eye shadows like this. If or when I discover some, I’ll add them to this post. If you can think of any, please leave them in the comments section below!!

SONY DSC

Shimmer & Glow Shadows from Left to Right: Kitten, Grace, and Twig

SONY DSC

Shimmer & Glow Shadows from Left to Right: Kitten, Grace, and Twig

SONY DSC

Shimmer & Glow Shadows from Left to Right: Kitten, Grace, and Twig

SONY DSC

Shimmer & Glow Shadows from Left to Right: Kitten, Grace, and Twig. Photo taken outdoors in natural sunlight. Eye Shadows swatched on MAC NC20 skin.

SONY DSC

Kitten

SONY DSC

Kitten

SONY DSC

Kitten

Kitten:   This Shimmer & Glow shadow is described as a “shimmering vibrant nude pink”. It’s a light, warm toned, pinky nude with a metallic finish that has a finely milled type of multidimensional reflects but is NOT a glitter… I think it’s just the pigment used to make this formula. The reflects is visible in the tube and on the applicator, but it still adds to the shimmery effect once it’s applied. You can apply this under a powder shadow but it also looks beautiful on it’s own, especially worn all over the lid and inner corner.

The formula is lightweight and pretty liquidy so it’s easy to apply. It takes a second to dry down, so just make sure it sets before you look up or do something that may transfer the product to another area of your eyelid. Color payoff is great but it does seem to look a little more pinky toned on my skin than it does in the tube. Coverage can be made sheer by blending this out with a fluffy brush, but if you apply it directly to the lid with the applicator, the coverage is fully opaque using very little product. Worn all over the lid, I got about 7 hours of wear time before it began to crease or fade.

Overall Rating:   4.6 / 5

Application:   4

Coverage:  5

Color Payoff:   5

Texture:   5

Wear Time:   4

Packaging:   5

Value:   4

SONY DSC

Grace

SONY DSC

Grace

SONY DSC

Grace

Grace:   Grace is referred to as a “shimmering rose gold”. It’s a light-medium, warm toned, tan rose gold with the same type of very finely milled, multidimensional reflects that Kitten has. It’s pretty metallic when worn without blending it out, but I actually really like this when I apply it all over the lid, then blend it out and up into the crease a little just to diffuse the edges and make it more sheer. It’s also gorgeous when worn at full opacity on the lid and inner corner.

Grace has the same texture as Kitten, so it applies easily and evenly. Coverage is full and color payoff is great, although these shadows seem to darken a little once they set. It’s nothing drastic, though. Wear time was around 7 hours when applied straight to the lid with the applicator without blending it out at all, and a little over 8 hours when I sheered it out.

Overall Rating:   4.6 / 5

Application:   4

Coverage:  5

Color Payoff:   5

Texture:   5

Wear Time:   4

Packaging:   5

Value:   4

SONY DSC

Twig

SONY DSC

Twig

SONY DSC

Twig

Twig:   Twig is a “shimmering warm chestnut brown”… It’s a dark, very rich, warm toned brown with hint of pinky-bronze sheen to it. I feel like because this isn’t as light as the other two Shimmer & Glow shadows, it doesn’t seem to have quite as much sheen but it’s still very pretty and is easily worn by all skin tones. I LOVE this shadow all over the lid for a bronze, smoky type of look. It’s also super pretty if you pop this on the lid and blend it out with a fluffy brush to sheer it down, then blend a little along the lower lash line with a soft pencil brush.

It has the same consistency as the other two Shimmer & Glow shadows, so it’s lightweight, comfortable, and applies easily. Color payoff looks pretty much the same as it does in the tube and Twig doesn’t seem to darken as much as the two lighter shades in this kit. Coverage is totally opaque without having to use much product at all. Wear time when blended out is close to 8 hours and more like 7 hours when worn at full opacity.

Overall Rating:   4.6 / 5

Application:   4

Coverage:  5

Color Payoff:   5

Texture:   5

Wear Time:   4

Packaging:   5

Value:   4

SONY DSC

Left to Right:   Peachy Sheen, Smoldering Satin, Next to Notte

SONY DSC

Left to Right:   Peachy Sheen, Smoldering Satin, Next to Notte

SONY DSC

Left to Right:   Peachy Sheen, Smoldering Satin, Next to Notte

SONY DSC

Glitter & Glow Shadows from Left to Right: Peachy Sheen, Smoldering Satin, and Next to Notte. Photo taken outdoors in natural sunlight. Eye Shadows swatched on MAC NC20 skin.

SONY DSC

Peachy Sheen

SONY DSC

Peachy Sheen

SONY DSC

Peachy Sheen

Peachy Sheen:   According to the Stila website, Peachy Sheen is a “sheer warm peachy beige with silver and gold glitter”. It’s a light, warm toned peachy nude base with a cooler tone to the silver and gold glitter particles. It’s also definitely very sheer, as you can see in the swatch and on the applicator itself. Because it’s so sheer, it ends up just looking half-assed and patchy unless you really put some effort into the application. Even then, it takes FOREVER to get much coverage or to get the glitter to look even on my lid. It looks better if you’re applying it over something like a shimmery MAC Pro Longwear Paint Pot (I tried it over Vintage Selection), or even one of the lighter Shimmer & Glow shadows in this set… That way you can just dot on a little bit of glitter for a more subtle type of sparkle. Honestly, I don’t see myself reaching for Peachy Sheen at all.

The texture of this particular shadow is thin and the glitter particles aren’t as, I don’t know, scratchy as they look, but it still doesn’t apply very smoothly. Some of the glittery bits will flake off once the shadow sets and dries if you try to layer this a lot or use a brush to try to blend it out once it’s set. Color payoff would probably look like it does in the tube IF you could actually get enough product out to show the base color. Like I said, it’s supposed to be sheer, but coverage is very, VERY minimal… Like on a ridiculous level. I would say wear time was around 4 hours before it started to fade, but it’s honestly hard to gauge because it was so patchy and practically non-existent on my lid to begin with.

Overall Rating:   2 / 5

Application:   1

Coverage:  1

Color Payoff:   1

Texture:   2

Wear Time:   2

Packaging:   5

Value:   2

SONY DSC

Smoldering Satin

SONY DSC

Smoldering Satin

SONY DSC

Smoldering Satin

Smoldering Satin:   This Glitter & Glow shadow is described as a “deep tan and silver glitter”. I meeeean to me, it’s more of a medium, cool toned taupey-mauve with a HINT of tan as the base color, but the glitter is indeed silver. It’s pretty and it’s very wearable with a lot of different looks and will work well for any skin tone.

The texture of Smoldering Satin is a little thicker than Peachy Sheen so it does apply more easily. It can be a little tricky to layer (if you even need to) because sometimes trying to apply more of this product over itself can actually remove some of the glitter from the first layer you applied, or even cause some glitter fallout… Just be sure to go in with a light hand! Color payoff is good but it does seem to look a little darker and cooler toned on the applicator and on the skin than it does in the tube. Coverage is nearly full, I’d say it’s about 70% opaque with one layer of product, but you can go in and gently add a little more if needed. Wear time when worn all over the lid is around 6 hours before it began to crease. After the first two hours or so, I started to see some glitter fallout, which was a bit annoying.

Overall Rating:   3.6 / 5

Application:   3

Coverage:  3

Color Payoff:   4

Texture:   3

Wear Time:   3

Packaging:   5

Value:   4

SONY DSC

Next to Notte

SONY DSC

Next to Notte

SONY DSC

Next to Notte

Next to Notte:   This is a “deep red with pink glitter” and is a rich, slightly cool toned, medium-dark, plummy-red with glitter that reflects somewhere between pink and magenta. It’s a really fun color, especially if you want to use it with a bold, smoky look or something like that for the holidays. It’s definitely the most colorful shadow in this set, which may not be for everyone but since this comes in the set, it’s worth trying out, even if it’s not something you’d typically wear!

The texture of Next to Notte is the smoothest of the three Glitter & Glow shadows in this set. It’s not like the glitter particles are any different, but as you can see on the applicator, this one is a bit more creamy and the product seems to be thicker and more pigmented. Color payoff is good but like all of the other liquid shadows in this set, it does look darker and maybe a little more plum toned once I applied it to my skin. Coverage was alright but still not fully opaque, so some layering may be necessary. This shadow wore well on the lid for around 6-7 hours before I had any issues with creasing or fading. I did have a bit of glitter fallout throughout the day, though.

Overall Rating:   3.7 / 5

Application:   3

Coverage:  3

Color Payoff:   4

Texture:   4

Wear Time:   3

Packaging:   5

Value:   4

 

*** This post expresses my own honest opinion. I purchased these with my own money and did not receive any type of PR or compensation for this review. ***

 

Advertisements

Here is yet another outdated post for you! Again, my apologies for just now posting this, since it came out last June, but since I have all the photos and swatches done already, I wanted to share them so maybe I can help you all find something similar that you may already have or that’s permanent if you missed out on these Fluidlines when they were released with the Moody Blooms collection! Enjoy!

Black Ivy   -   Copperthorn   -   Nightshade

Black Ivy – Copperthorn – Nightshade

 

MAC Fluidlines are an “Ultra-smooth, gel formula that provides the precision of a liquid liner with a silkier, softer finish”. They’re a very smooth, easy to apply formula that wears all day without smudging or flaking. I’m not a big fan of liquid liners but this gel formula is thicker and creamier than a liquid so to me, it’s easier to control. While there aren’t waterproof, they are smudge-proof on most people (unless your eyes are excessively watery… then I just wouldn’t wear them near the bottom inner corner or maybe not below the lower lash line). I don’t necessarily recommend these for the waterline… The shimmery kinds are a definite no-no for that area, but the creamier ones can be tried on the waterline if you want to give it a shot (though MAC does not suggest using Fluidlines on that area of the eye).

For application you can use so many different brushes… It really depends on personal preference. For a smaller line with more control and detail, a MAC 210 brush will work well… A MAC 209 is also suitable and is a bit bigger, so you’ll get a thicker line. My favorite brushes, especially for a winged look, are the MAC 263 or 266 angled brushes… Fluidlines are the perfect eye liner for a winged look, so I definitely recommend picking up a 263 brush if you’re into that look and are purchasing a Fluidline or have some at home already!

TIP 1:   When storing your Fluidlines in your makeup case or drawer, make sure they’re upside down with the label up! This will keep them from drying out.

TIP 2:   These can also be used as eye shadow bases, like Pro Longwear Paint Pots!

These Fluidlines are all limited edition and were released on Thursday, June 26th, 2014. While these are limited, I DID find them on the Dillard’s website with all three colors in stock! This could be a good sign that you might still be able to find them at your local MAC counter or store, unless they have already RTV’d them (sent them back to the company), which they do when limited launch products don’t sell out after a certain period of time. They are not on the MAC website, though. Like all MAC Fluidlines, these come in a glass pot with a black semi-matte plastic, screw-on lid. They contain 3 g / 0.1 US oz of product and sell for $16.

 

Moody Blooms Fluidline Labels

Black Ivy   -   Copperthorn   -   Nightshade

Black Ivy – Copperthorn – Nightshade

Photo taken outdoors in natural lighting. Fluidlines watched on NC20 skin.

Photo taken outdoors in natural lighting.
Fluidlines watched on NC20 skin.

Black Ivy

Black Ivy

Black Ivy

Black Ivy

Black Ivy:   This Fluidline is described as a “blackened green” and has a creamy, but somewhat shimmery finish… It’s a deepened teal with cooler, blue based undertones  with a creamy base that dries somewhat matte, and very, very fine shimmer particles. The texture felt smooth and creamy and was pretty easy to apply. Color payoff was good and looked nearly like it does in the pot without any layering. Coverage was also great and didn’t require much product on the brush to get an even application. I got over 9 hours of wear before I noticed any fading or smudging. Black Ivy was by far the best Fluidline out of this collection.

Dupes:   Waveline, which is the only permanent Fluidline from MAC that’s anywhere close isn’t really close at all… It’s MUCH brighter, lighter and a true blue. Shade Fluidline, which was limited edition, it close, but lighter and more green based (I don’t remember the collection it was released with, sorry!). Canard Creme Liner from Laura Mercier is in the same color family, but is more of a brighter, lighter teal.

Overall Rating:   5 / 5

Application:   5

Coverage:  5

Color Payoff:   5

Texture:   5

Wear Time:   5

Packaging:   5

Copperthorn

Copperthorn

Copperthorn

Copperthorn

Copperthorn:   This is described as a “glittery bronze” and has a very glittery finish… It’s has a  medium, warm toned golden-copper base with pretty decent sized pieces (for a Fluidline anyway) of gold, bronze, and coppery glitter particles. The texture was not my favorite to work with… I hate to say it because it’s sooooo pretty but it did take some effort to apply this evenly, no matter what type of brush I used. The color payoff is good and just as shimmery on the eye as it is in the pan. Coverage, on the other hand, was subpar. It took a bit of layering to get this to go on opaque, with the first layer being semi-sheer at best as far as the base color was concerned. I had to let this completely dry before I added layer two, then it looked much better… The only issue with having to layer a gel liner like this is that you can lose some precision in the process, so I recommend a very skinny brush for the wing! I got about 6 hours of wear with Copperthorn before I noticed some glittery fallout below my eye, but I didn’t notice much, if any, fading or smudging otherwise.

Copperthorn is an absolute NO-NO for the waterline! Do NOT apply this on the inner rim of the eye because the glitter particles can get into your eye causing irritation! I actually liked this Fluidline better as an eye shadow or eye shadow base on my lid, rather than a liner!

Dupes:   Rich Ground is the closest permanent dupe, but it’s not THAT close… It’s deeper, has a micro-shimmer, but no glitter, and is more of a reddish bronze shade. Brassy (long been discontinued) is similar in color, but still has a more yellow based bronze color and no glitter. There are two limited edition shades from MAC’s Indulge collection (Fall 2013) that ate similar as far as the finish goes, but not quite spot on for color… Gilt Gourmet is lighter, more of a yellow-gold, and has smaller glittery particles, while Deliciously Rich is a darker, more cool toned brown/bronze with golden bronze micro-glitter.

Overall Rating:   3.3 / 5

Application:   3

Coverage:  2

Color Payoff:   3

Texture:   3

Wear Time:   4

Packaging:   5

Nightshade

Nightshade

Nightshade

Nightshade

Nightshade:   This Fluidline is a “blackened plum” and has a soft, shimmery finish… It’s a medium dark plum with warmer purple undertones and a warm sheen, thanks to the reddish/coppery/golden micro-shimmer particles in it! The texture feels smooth and easy to apply, though it seems to look a little patchy, despite the initial creamy feeling of this liner. Color payoff is good, though not as dark or intense as it is in the pot without some layering. If you want fully opaque coverage, you’ll have to do some layering for that as well. With one layer, it was kinda sort of sheer and as I mentioned before, slightly patchy. You definitely want to use something like a MAC 210 brush for application so you don’t lose precision when layering this liner. By layer two, it looked perfectly even and true to pot color. Nightshade gave me about 8 hours of wear before smudging or fading.

Dupes:   Macroviolet, which is permanent, is darker and more of a true, cooler toned purple, but it’s the best dupe I could find!

Overall Rating:   4 / 5

Application:   3

Coverage:  3

Color Payoff:   4

Texture:   4

Wear Time:   5

Packaging:   5

There are two brand new Superslick Eye Liners out with the RiRi Hearts MAC Holiday collection and I’m super excited about them! I feel like this eyeliner formula is overlooked far too often, aside from the most popular color, On The Hunt, which is a rich, slick black. The two new colors, Cockiness and Pisces Persuasion, are unique and perfect for the holiday season, so be sure to check these out next time you’re at MAC!

RiRi Hearts MAC Superslick Liner & Box

 

The Superslick formula is water based but also water-resistant, though I’ve found these to be pretty much waterproof. According to MAC’s website, the formula “dries in 15 seconds to provide a sleek, longwearing, wet-look, no-smudge line”… That’s pretty accurate! The Superslick name definitely implies that this formula has a slick, wet look rather than the usual dull matte finish that so many water-resistant eye liners have. I like this because I feel like it draws more attention to the liner and adds something special to the entire look. Wear time is amazing… I get a minimum of 12 hours wear… Usually longer, like until I remove it! I love this because I wear contacts and have allergies, so my eyes water quite a bit. I’ve never had any issues with smudging or smearing with the Superslick liners so I definitely recommend these to anyone who has problems with their liquid liner wearing off too easily!

Packaging for these Superslicks goes along with the rest of the RiRi Hearts MAC collection, being the pearly white with rose gold accents and the signature “R” and “RiRi” on the packaging. The applicator is a super easy to use… “The superior no-fuss, no-wobble application lies in the “magic tip” of the easy-to-control dip-stick applicator”… It’s a somewhat stiff, but not hard, tapered, thin, marker-like tip that’s very easy to control and get anything from a thin, defined line to a big, thick wing with. Another option for application (if the marker tip isn’t your thing) is a MAC 210 or 263 synthetic angled brush… You can use the applicator to put a bit of the product onto a palette, then dip your brush into it. Although Superslicks are water-resistant, they are not recommended for use on the waterline (inner rim of the eye). The water-based formula takes too long to dry and will just end up getting into the eye and causing irritation.

Both of these Superslick Eye Liners were released on Thursday, December 12th and are available now at all MAC stores, counters, and online at www.maccosmetics.com. As far as I know, Cockiness is still available online but Pisces Persuasion is sold out. They both seem to still be in stock at most counters and stores, though. Each of these liners sells for $20.50 and contains 1.8 ml / 0.06 US oz of product. That’s $1 more than the permanent ones, due to the beautiful special packaging, while they still contain the same amount of product.

NOTE:   I will most likely be redoing all of these photos this weekend once I find my black background. They’ll show up much better that way!

RiRI Holiday Superslick Labels

RiRi Superslick Liners

 

Photo taken outdoors in natural sunlight (on a sort of cloudy day). Superslick Eye Liners swatched on NC15 skin.

Photo taken outdoors in natural sunlight (on a sort of cloudy day).
Superslick Eye Liners swatched on NC15 skin.

I will be adding a better swatch photo soon! This one was taken on a cloudy day and doesn’t show how pigmented and opaque these really are… Sorry! I’ll have the new pic up tomorrow hopefully!

Cockiness

Cockiness

Cockiness:   This Superslick Eye Liner is a “shimmery rose gold”… It’s a very glittery, frosty, medium, warm rose gold with multidimensional copper, pink, and pearly gold shimmer particles. Though it looks somewhat sheer swatched, it applies more heavily to the eye. With one to two dips into the tube (for a pretty thick wing), I get great color payoff and coverage.

One fun thing about Cockiness is that you can make this stand out a bit more by applying it over a darker liquid eye liner like a black, dark brown, dark copper, purple, or blue. I’ve tried it over MAC Fluidlines like Blacktrack, Dipdown, Rich Ground, Macroviolet, and Waveline and it transforms them all to something really unique and beautiful! You can even apply a thinner line of Cockiness over your other liquid liner for a fun, multicolored wing.

Dupes:   I can’t think of anything that’s terribly close to Cockiness… The permanent gold Superslick Eye Liner, Pure Show, is a much lighter, much more yellow gold without any glitter. Rich Ground Fluidline is also much darker and more of a coppery brown.

Overall Rating:   5 / 5

Application:   5

Coverage:  5

Color Payoff:   5

Texture:   5

Wear Time:  5

Packaging:   5

Pisces Persuasion

Pisces Persuasion

Pisces Persuasion:   MAC describes this liner as a “shimmery white”… It’s a light, cool toned white with a gorgeous silvery, pearly shimmer and a very frosted, glittery finish. Like Cockiness, this didn’t swatch as pigmented and opaque as it actually is… While the coverage isn’t as heavy as Cockiness, it does have good color/product payoff with not much product applied. You may have to apply more than one layer of Pisces Persuasion to achieve fully opaque coverage, but it applies smoothly and layers easily, so that shouldn’t be a problem.

Like Cockiness, you can have a lot of fun layering Pisces Persuasion over other liquid liners… I’ve been trying this over all kinds of MAC Fluidlines and other Superslicks to create really fun, different looks. Another trick you can do with this liner is to tap the applicator on the very tips of your upper lashes for a festive glitter lash for the holidays… It almost looks like you have glittery little snowflakes at the tips of your lashes!

Dupes:   I honestly can’t think of any… There’s nothing out there from MAC or any other brands that I know of that’s anywhere close to Pisces Persuasion.

Overall Rating:   4.7 / 5

Application:   5

Coverage:  4

Color Payoff:   4

Texture:   5

Wear Time:  5

Packaging:   5

MAC has had Pressed Pigments as part of their permanent range for a little over a year but last week they released some new colors and decided to repromote some of their current, permanent ones. This is still a relatively new formula that some people may not even realize exists, so I’m glad they decided to expand their color range and repromote this product!

For the other parts of the Pressed Pigments posts, click on the links below:

MAC Pressed Pigments – Part 1 of 4

MAC Pressed Pigments – Part 2 of 4

MAC Pressed Pigments – Part 3 of 4

 

MAC Pressed Pigments Group 4

 

Pressed Pigments are their own type of product… They’re not like the loose pigments that many of you are probably used to. This is MAC’s description of this product:

“An intensely creamy highlighter offering extreme pearlescence and versatility of finish. Apply dry for a high shine, or on damp skin for a dramatic wet look. Provides eye-catching sheer-to-moderate buildable coverage and natural dimension finish. Pressed Pigment is delicate. Please handle with care.”

To break that down, Pressed Pigments are a creamy feeling powder… They are not an actual cream product. They are extremely versatile, which I will get to in the next paragraph or two, and can be used for many purposes, which I will also explain. These are finely milled, though not as smooth as loose pigments are. The glitter/shimmer particles range from small to, well, not to small, which tends to be the biggest factor in how smoothly these apply, either dry or damp. Overall, I love these and I like how shimmery they are and how they can be applied for a soft wash of color and shine or applied so that your eyelid looks like an intense, bright little disco ball. Also, as far as the “handle with care” part goes… Do just that. These break easily if dropped and can crack if you dig at them with a spatula or anything, so be gentle with your Pressed Pigments!

This is a product that you have to work with in order to appreciate… But don’t let that scare you away from trying these out! It’s not your average eye shadow and doesn’t usually apply easily when treated like it’s one. Typically, when I apply these to the eye, I use them damp because it wears longer and goes on with little to no fallout (you know, that glittery fairy vomit that ends up below your eyes). Applied to the face, lip, or even body (like the collarbone) as a highlight, I tend to use these dry because I don’t want that super glittery intensity.

APPLICATION TIPS: Aside from the typical damp,dry applications, here are a few other tips for you…

1) Wear a primer underneath your Pressed Pigment, whether you apply it dry or damp. This will make it wear longer and prevent any creasing. My favorites are MAC Paint Pots or Pro Longwear Paint Pots. You can use a neutral color like Soft Ochre, Painterly, or Groundwork, or use one that has some shine and color to it that will match, intensify, or even transform the color of the Pressed Pigment (Blackground is a nice one if you wanna intensify or transform… Seriously, play around with it and see what happens).

2) Apply Pressed Pigments to the lid AFTER you do your crease or blending colors that will go around it. Or apply them VERY carefully after you put your Pressed Pigment on. When you use a fluffy blending brush, like a MAC 217 or 222 on or around a Pressed Pigment, it’s going to spread the shimmer/glitter particles to areas that you may not want them.

3) Aside from your typical damp or dry use with a brush, you can apply these dry with your fingers. If you do this, gently swipe your finger over the Pressed Pigment, but don’t dig it in there with too much pressure (this smashes down the powder and hardens it)… By applying with your finger, it’s going to warm up the product and mix it with the natural oils on your skin. When you apply it to the eyelid like this, it feels super creamy and gives good coverage and color payoff with a very smooth application. You can also use this technique for a highlight on the tops of the cheekbones or anywhere you want a glow to the face, just make sure you don’t load up too much product on your fingertip. Oh! And you can tap a little on the center of your lip for a shimmery pouty look ;)

DAMP USE:   You will get the most intense color payoff and shimmer/sheen if you use Pressed Pigments with a dampened brush. When you use them like this, it also lessens the chance that you’ll have any issues with fallout below the eye. The trick with these is using the right brush! When you apply these damp to the eyelid, I suggest using a MAC 215 Medium Shader Brush, which was released with the Pressed Pigments. You can also use a MAC 239 or 242 (my personal favorite)… A MAC 249, 252, or 287 will work for larger lids, while for more detail or a smaller lid, you can use a  MAC 212, 231, 228, or 214. Basically, you want a brush that’s somewhat flat and dense, and the more dense your brush is, the more product it will apply. Also, the smoother and flatter the brush, the smoother the application will be. After you choose which brush to use, you will want to dampen the brush with something like MAC Fix + Spray or Water Base Mixing Medium (from MAC PRO). Once the brush is dampened, swipe it across one area of the Pressed Pigment and tap off excess product. TIP: Only use one area of the Pressed Pigment as a designated “damp area” so it does not create a sort of crust on the rest of the product, which can make it difficult to use dry. I usually use a small area at the top of each one so I remember where my damp spot is. Also, try not to spray the product itself, as it will surely form a crust and can promote the growth of bacteria (gross!). To prevent bacteria growth after damp use, lightly spray your Pressed Pigment with rubbing alcohol when it’s dry, then use a tissue to gently wipe off the top layer of product.

DRY USE:  When used dry, Pressed Pigments aren’t usually as intense for either color payoff or sheen/glitter and appear more as a soft wash of color and shimmer. I recommend using the same brushes for dry application on the eyelid, but make sure you tap off excess product to avoid fallout. These don’t apply all that well with a fluffy type of brush and will give you fallout if you use a brush like that or try to blend them too much. Another dry use for the more natural skin tone-like shades of Pressed Pigments is as a highlighter below the brow, on the tops of the cheekbones, down the bridge of nose, above the cupid’s bow of your lip, even on the collarbone, etc… Anywhere you want some shimmer and glow. For an application like this, you can use a dense brush or a fluffier brush, depending on how much shimmer and color you want. My favorite brushes for this type of application are the MAC 286 and 288 Duo Fibre brushes… The 286 if fluffier and domed, so it will give you a lighter application, while the 288 is more dense and flat and will apply the Pressed Pigment a bit more heavily. For a super light highlight application, use a Duo Fibre fan brush, like a MAC 184 (from MAC PRO).

Okay, now that I’ve explained all of that, I’ll tell you where you can get these babies! Pressed Pigments were released last Thursday, August 1st, so they’re available now online at www.maccosmetics.com or at your local MAC store or counter. Some of these are limited edition, while some will be staying in the permanent range, which I will specify in each review. Each Pressed Pigment contains 3 g / .10 US oz of product and sells for $21.

Pressed Pigments Group 4 Labels

 

Left:   Dry    Right:   Damp Photo taken outdoors in natural sunlight. Pressed Pigments swatched on NC20 skin.

Left: Dry                                                         Right: Damp
Photo taken outdoors in natural sunlight. Pressed Pigments swatched on NC20 skin.

Pink Pepper

Pink Pepper

Pink Pepper

Pink Pepper

Pink Pepper:   Pink Pepper is a “deep coral with gold pearl” and is one of the limited edition Pressed Pigments that were recently released. It’s a warm, medium pinkish coral with golden shimmer/pearl. Dry, I got good color payoff and coverage, although it wasn’t completely opaque. It appears more pinkish when applied dry, but still has a golden sheen. Damp, Pink Pepper showed more of the orange-coral tones. Damp application also made the golden pearl effect more intense and gave better color payoff and totally opaque coverage. Both dry and damp, this Pressed Pigment felt smooth and didn’t give much fallout.

Overall Rating:   4.3 / 5

Application:   4

Coverage:  4

Color Payoff:   5

Texture:   4

Wear Time:   4

Packaging:   5

Rock Candy

Rock Candy

Rock Candy

Rock Candy

Rock Candy:   Rock Candy is a “mid-tone fuchsia” and is new, but will remain in MAC’s permanent range of Pressed Pigments… It’s a light to medium, warm toned pink with loads of shimmer/glitter. When applied dry, Rock Candy gave good color payoff and decent but semi-sheer coverage with lots of shimmer. Damp, it almost seems lighter but I think that’s because it becomes SUPER frosty/metallic and reflects more light. Damp application gave good color payoff and complete opacity. The only complaint I have about this Pressed Pigment is that the shimmer/glitter particles are a bit larger than the ones in some of the other Pressed Pigments, so it doesn’t apply as smoothly and can cause some fallout issues.

Overall Rating:   3.8 / 5

Application:   3

Coverage:  4

Color Payoff:   4

Texture:   3

Wear Time:   4

Packaging:   5

Sorry the picture isn't great quality, this one had to be retaken after swatching.

Sorry the picture isn’t great quality, this one had to be retaken after swatching.

Smoky

Smoky

Smoky:   Smoky is a “deep silver blue” and is one of MAC’s permanent shades of Pressed Pigments. It’s a medium-dark, soft, cool toned charcoal blue with a silvery sheen. The shimmery particles in this Pressed Pigment are very finely milled, so it applies smoothly with no fallout problems. Dry, it has great color payoff and semi-sheer, but still good, coverage. It’s also a bit lighter and less frosty when applied dry. When you apply Smoky damp, it shows more of a silvery sheen, has better color payoff, and gives full coverage. Damp application also makes it darker and more grayish toned.

Overall Rating:   4.2 / 5

Application:   4

Coverage:  4

Color Payoff:   4

Texture:   4

Wear Time:   4

Packaging:   5

Summer Honey

Summer Honey

Summer Honey

Summer Honey

Summer Honey:   Summer Honey is described as a “pastel coral” and sadly, it’s part of the limited edition colors that were released recently, so get this one while you can! It’s a beautiful, soft, warm toned creamy peach with plenty of shimmer. The shimmery bits are finely milled, so Summer Honey feels smooth when applied both dry and damp and won’t cause fallout problems. Dry, Summer Honey is pretty sheer and only gives so-so color payoff… It also appears more of a peachy cream with a soft cream colored sheen. Damp is when this gives much better color payoff and coverage, but it still doesn’t apply totally opaque. When applied damp, Summer Honey also looks much more metallic and peachy. This color is neutral enough to also be used as a highlight on the face and body.

Overall Rating:   4 / 5

Application:   4

Coverage:  3

Color Payoff:   4

Texture:   4

Wear Time:   4

Packaging:   5

Vanilla Diamond

Vanilla Diamond

Vanilla Diamond

Vanilla Diamond

Vanilla Diamond:   Vanilla Diamond is a “warm yellow beige” and is one of the new limited edition Pressed Pigments… It’s a light, warm, golden cream color with a warm, champagne sheen. The shimmery particles are very fine, so this Pressed Pigment will apply smoothly both dry or damp and layer well. Dry, it’s semi-sheer and gives a soft, pale kind of color payoff and subtle sheen. Damp, Vanilla Diamond becomes much more true to the color it is in the pan, gives nearly opaque coverage, and looks almost metallic it becomes so frosted. To me, this is one of the more versatile, high-quality Pressed Pigments in the whole lineup of them. Since this is a light, neutral color, it works well as a highlight for face and body on pale to medium skintones.

Overall Rating:   4.3 / 5

Application:   4

Coverage:  4

Color Payoff:   4

Texture:   5

Wear Time:   4

Packaging:   5

 

 

 

 

 

MAC has had Pressed Pigments as part of their permanent range for a little over a year but last week they released some new colors and decided to repromote some of their current, permanent ones. This is still a relatively new formula that some people may not even realize exists, so I’m glad they decided to expand their color range and repromote this product!

Because there are so many of these, I’ll be posting these reviews in parts so it’s not one huge, overwhelming post! To check out previous posts on Pressed Pigments, click these links:

MAC Pressed Pigments – Part 1 of 4

MAC Pressed Pigments – Part 2 of 4

MAC Pressed Pigments Group 2

 

Pressed Pigments are their own type of product… They’re not like the loose pigments that many of you are probably used to. This is MAC’s description of this product:

“An intensely creamy highlighter offering extreme pearlescence and versatility of finish. Apply dry for a high shine, or on damp skin for a dramatic wet look. Provides eye-catching sheer-to-moderate buildable coverage and natural dimension finish. Pressed Pigment is delicate. Please handle with care.”

To break that down, Pressed Pigments are a creamy feeling powder… They are not an actual cream product. They are extremely versatile, which I will get to in the next paragraph or two, and can be used for many purposes, which I will also explain. These are finely milled, though not as smooth as loose pigments are. The glitter/shimmer particles range from small to, well, not to small, which tends to be the biggest factor in how smoothly these apply, either dry or damp. Overall, I love these and I like how shimmery they are and how they can be applied for a soft wash of color and shine or applied so that your eyelid looks like an intense, bright little disco ball. Also, as far as the “handle with care” part goes… Do just that. These break easily if dropped and can crack if you dig at them with a spatula or anything, so be gentle with your Pressed Pigments!

This is a product that you have to work with in order to appreciate… But don’t let that scare you away from trying these out! It’s not your average eye shadow and doesn’t usually apply easily when treated like it’s one. Typically, when I apply these to the eye, I use them damp because it wears longer and goes on with little to no fallout (you know, that glittery fairy vomit that ends up below your eyes). Applied to the face, lip, or even body (like the collarbone) as a highlight, I tend to use these dry because I don’t want that super glittery intensity.

APPLICATION TIPS: Aside from the typical damp,dry applications, here are a few other tips for you…

1) Wear a primer underneath your Pressed Pigment, whether you apply it dry or damp. This will make it wear longer and prevent any creasing. My favorites are MAC Paint Pots or Pro Longwear Paint Pots. You can use a neutral color like Soft Ochre, Painterly, or Groundwork, or use one that has some shine and color to it that will match, intensify, or even transform the color of the Pressed Pigment (Blackground is a nice one if you wanna intensify or transform… Seriously, play around with it and see what happens).

2) Apply Pressed Pigments to the lid AFTER you do your crease or blending colors that will go around it. Or apply them VERY carefully after you put your Pressed Pigment on. When you use a fluffy blending brush, like a MAC 217 or 222 on or around a Pressed Pigment, it’s going to spread the shimmer/glitter particles to areas that you may not want them.

3) Aside from your typical damp or dry use with a brush, you can apply these dry with your fingers. If you do this, gently swipe your finger over the Pressed Pigment, but don’t dig it in there with too much pressure (this smashes down the powder and hardens it)… By applying with your finger, it’s going to warm up the product and mix it with the natural oils on your skin. When you apply it to the eyelid like this, it feels super creamy and gives good coverage and color payoff with a very smooth application. You can also use this technique for a highlight on the tops of the cheekbones or anywhere you want a glow to the face, just make sure you don’t load up too much product on your fingertip. Oh! And you can tap a little on the center of your lip for a shimmery pouty look ;)

DAMP USE:   You will get the most intense color payoff and shimmer/sheen if you use Pressed Pigments with a dampened brush. When you use them like this, it also lessens the chance that you’ll have any issues with fallout below the eye. The trick with these is using the right brush! When you apply these damp to the eyelid, I suggest using a MAC 215 Medium Shader Brush, which was released with the Pressed Pigments. You can also use a MAC 239 or 242 (my personal favorite)… A MAC 249, 252, or 287 will work for larger lids, while for more detail or a smaller lid, you can use a  MAC 212, 231, 228, or 214. Basically, you want a brush that’s somewhat flat and dense, and the more dense your brush is, the more product it will apply. Also, the smoother and flatter the brush, the smoother the application will be. After you choose which brush to use, you will want to dampen the brush with something like MAC Fix + Spray or Water Base Mixing Medium (from MAC PRO). Once the brush is dampened, swipe it across one area of the Pressed Pigment and tap off excess product. TIP: Only use one area of the Pressed Pigment as a designated “damp area” so it does not create a sort of crust on the rest of the product, which can make it difficult to use dry. I usually use a small area at the top of each one so I remember where my damp spot is. Also, try not to spray the product itself, as it will surely form a crust and can promote the growth of bacteria (gross!). To prevent bacteria growth after damp use, lightly spray your Pressed Pigment with rubbing alcohol when it’s dry, then use a tissue to gently wipe off the top layer of product.

DRY USE:  When used dry, Pressed Pigments aren’t usually as intense for either color payoff or sheen/glitter and appear more as a soft wash of color and shimmer. I recommend using the same brushes for dry application on the eyelid, but make sure you tap off excess product to avoid fallout. These don’t apply all that well with a fluffy type of brush and will give you fallout if you use a brush like that or try to blend them too much. Another dry use for the more natural skin tone-like shades of Pressed Pigments is as a highlighter below the brow, on the tops of the cheekbones, down the bridge of nose, above the cupid’s bow of your lip, even on the collarbone, etc… Anywhere you want some shimmer and glow. For an application like this, you can use a dense brush or a fluffier brush, depending on how much shimmer and color you want. My favorite brushes for this type of application are the MAC 286 and 288 Duo Fibre brushes… The 286 if fluffier and domed, so it will give you a lighter application, while the 288 is more dense and flat and will apply the Pressed Pigment a bit more heavily. For a super light highlight application, use a Duo Fibre fan brush, like a MAC 184 (from MAC PRO).

Okay, now that I’ve explained all of that, I’ll tell you where you can get these babies! Pressed Pigments were released last Thursday, August 1st, so they’re available now online at www.maccosmetics.com or at your local MAC store or counter. Some of these are limited edition, while some will be staying in the permanent range, which I will specify in each review. Each Pressed Pigment contains 3 g / .10 US oz of product and sells for $21.

MAC Pressed Pigments Group 2 Labels

 

Left: Dry                                                           Right: Damp
Click on photo to enlarge.
Photo taken outdoors in natural sunlight. Pressed Pigments swatched on NC20 skin.

Enlightening

Enlightening

Enlightening

Enlightening

Enlightening:   Enlightening is a “deep silver” and is part of MAC’s permanent range of Pressed Pigments. It’s a true silver with intense amounts of highly metallic shimmer/glitter. Dry, it will give you a softer wash of light silver with plenty of shimmer, decent color payoff, but semi-sheer coverage. Damp, it becomes much more metallic, a bit darker/more intense, and gives good color payoff and nearly opaque coverage. The shimmer/glitter particles in Enlightening are not all that fine, so application can be tricky unless you use the right brush! I definitely recommend applying this one damp… Dry, I had some issues with fallout.

Overall Rating:   3.7 / 5

Application:   3

Coverage:  4

Color Payoff:   3

Texture:   3

Wear Time:   4

Packaging:   5

Flicker

Flicker

Flicker

Flicker

Flicker:   This Pressed Pigment is described as a “pastel yellow” and is permanent in MAC’s Pressed Pigment line. It’s a warm, creamy color with only a hint of a golden yellow tone. It’s pretty shimmery, but not quite metallic, either dry or damp. When applied dry, this is a soft, shimmery, creamy color with good color payoff but not complete coverage. Dampened, Flicker is frostier and gives better color payoff and opacity. The shimmer particles in this Pressed Pigment are finely milled, so it applies smoothly both damp and dry and didn’t give me much fallout. Flicker also works as a highlight on the face and body for pale to light skintones.

Overall Rating:   4 / 5

Application:   4

Coverage:  3

Color Payoff:   4

Texture:   4

Wear Time:   4

Packaging:   5

Lime Ice

Lime Ice

Lime Ice

Lime Ice

Lime Ice:   Lime Ice is a “seafoam green” and is one of the limited edition colors in MAC’s recent repromote collection of Pressed Pigments. It’s a light green with some subtle golden tones. It’s very shimmery but is more like a soft wash of color, no matter how you apply it. Dry, this is a pale seafoam green with a soft golden sheen… The color payoff is nowhere near how it looks in the pan and the coverage is quite sheer. Applied damp, it helped add more color payoff and coverage, but it was still semi-sheer. Dampened application also made Lime Ice appear more metallic. One redeeming quality is that this Pressed Pigment applied super smoothly, no matter how much I layered it. It also gave little to no fallout. Overall, this is not the best performing Pressed Pigment in this lineup, but it does have it’s place if you want a soft all over lid color.

Overall Rating:   3.7 / 5

Application:   3

Coverage:  3

Color Payoff:   3

Texture:   4

Wear Time:   4

Packaging:   5

Midnight

Midnight

Midnight

Midnight

Midnight:   Midnight is a “vibrant deep blue” that’s new but will remain as part of MAC’s permanent range of Pressed Pigments. It’s a medium-dark, intense blackened blue that’s absolutely gorgeous! These photos don’t even do it justice! Dry, it gives great color payoff and is almost opaque but not quite… Dry application also has more of a shimmer than a true metallic finish. When applied damp, Midnight becomes much more intense and metallic, giving amazing color payoff and fully opaque coverage. Both dry and damp, Midnight glides on smoothly and gave little to no issues with fallout. This is by far one of the best of the new Pressed Pigments and is perfect for a colorful smoky eye.

Overall Rating:  4.3 / 5

Application:   4

Coverage:  4

Color Payoff:   5

Texture:   4

Wear Time:   4

Packaging:   5

Moth

Moth

Moth

Moth

Moth:   This is a “mauve with silver pearl” and is a new color of Pressed Pigment that will stay in the permanent lineup. It’s a soft, slightly cool toned, medium mauve with loads of frosty shimmer. The shimmer particles in this Pressed Pigments are slightly larger than they are in some of the others, so the texture isn’t as smooth, though that doesn’t seem to make applying it more difficult. Dry, Moth is a soft mauve with a silvery shimmery sheen and gives good color payoff, though applies semi-sheer. Applied damp, this Pressed Pigment gives fully opaque coverage, even better color payoff, and has a much more metallic finish.

Overall Rating:   4.2 / 5

Application:   4

Coverage:  4

Color Payoff:   4

Texture:   4

Wear Time:   4

Packaging:   5

 

 

 

 

 

 

MAC has had Pressed Pigments as part of their permanent range for a little over a year but last week they released some new colors and decided to repromote some of their current, permanent ones. This is still a relatively new formula that some people may not even realize exists, so I’m glad they decided to expand their color range and repromote this product!

Because there are so many of these, I’ll be posting these reviews in parts so it’s not one huge, overwhelming post! If you want to check out Part 1, click here: Pressed Pigments : Part 1. Enjoy Part 2 and check back for the other half of these posts!

Pressed Pigments Part 2

Pressed Pigments are their own type of product… They’re not like the loose pigments that many of you are probably used to. This is MAC’s description of this product:

“An intensely creamy highlighter offering extreme pearlescence and versatility of finish. Apply dry for a high shine, or on damp skin for a dramatic wet look. Provides eye-catching sheer-to-moderate buildable coverage and natural dimension finish. Pressed Pigment is delicate. Please handle with care.”

To break that down, Pressed Pigments are a creamy feeling powder… They are not an actual cream product. They are extremely versatile, which I will get to in the next paragraph or two, and can be used for many purposes, which I will also explain. These are finely milled, though not as smooth as loose pigments are. The glitter/shimmer particles range from small to, well, not to small, which tends to be the biggest factor in how smoothly these apply, either dry or damp. Overall, I love these and I like how shimmery they are and how they can be applied for a soft wash of color and shine or applied so that your eyelid looks like an intense, bright little disco ball. Also, as far as the “handle with care” part goes… Do just that. These break easily if dropped and can crack if you dig at them with a spatula or anything, so be gentle with your Pressed Pigments!

This is a product that you have to work with in order to appreciate… But don’t let that scare you away from trying these out! It’s not your average eye shadow and doesn’t usually apply easily when treated like it’s one. Typically, when I apply these to the eye, I use them damp because it wears longer and goes on with little to no fallout (you know, that glittery fairy vomit that ends up below your eyes). Applied to the face, lip, or even body (like the collarbone) as a highlight, I tend to use these dry because I don’t want that super glittery intensity.

APPLICATION TIPS: Aside from the typical damp,dry applications, here are a few other tips for you…

1) Wear a primer underneath your Pressed Pigment, whether you apply it dry or damp. This will make it wear longer and prevent any creasing. My favorites are MAC Paint Pots or Pro Longwear Paint Pots. You can use a neutral color like Soft Ochre, Painterly, or Groundwork, or use one that has some shine and color to it that will match, intensify, or even transform the color of the Pressed Pigment (Blackground is a nice one if you wanna intensify or transform… Seriously, play around with it and see what happens).

2) Apply Pressed Pigments to the lid AFTER you do your crease or blending colors that will go around it. Or apply them VERY carefully after you put your Pressed Pigment on. When you use a fluffy blending brush, like a MAC 217 or 222 on or around a Pressed Pigment, it’s going to spread the shimmer/glitter particles to areas that you may not want them.

3) Aside from your typical damp or dry use with a brush, you can apply these dry with your fingers. If you do this, gently swipe your finger over the Pressed Pigment, but don’t dig it in there with too much pressure (this smashes down the powder and hardens it)… By applying with your finger, it’s going to warm up the product and mix it with the natural oils on your skin. When you apply it to the eyelid like this, it feels super creamy and gives good coverage and color payoff with a very smooth application. You can also use this technique for a highlight on the tops of the cheekbones or anywhere you want a glow to the face, just make sure you don’t load up too much product on your fingertip. Oh! And you can tap a little on the center of your lip for a shimmery pouty look ;)

DAMP USE:   You will get the most intense color payoff and shimmer/sheen if you use Pressed Pigments with a dampened brush. When you use them like this, it also lessens the chance that you’ll have any issues with fallout below the eye. The trick with these is using the right brush! When you apply these damp to the eyelid, I suggest using a MAC 215 Medium Shader Brush, which was released with the Pressed Pigments. You can also use a MAC 239 or 242 (my personal favorite)… A MAC 249, 252, or 287 will work for larger lids, while for more detail or a smaller lid, you can use a  MAC 212, 231, 228, or 214. Basically, you want a brush that’s somewhat flat and dense, and the more dense your brush is, the more product it will apply. Also, the smoother and flatter the brush, the smoother the application will be. After you choose which brush to use, you will want to dampen the brush with something like MAC Fix + Spray or Water Base Mixing Medium (from MAC PRO). Once the brush is dampened, swipe it across one area of the Pressed Pigment and tap off excess product. TIP: Only use one area of the Pressed Pigment as a designated “damp area” so it does not create a sort of crust on the rest of the product, which can make it difficult to use dry. I usually use a small area at the top of each one so I remember where my damp spot is. Also, try not to spray the product itself, as it will surely form a crust and can promote the growth of bacteria (gross!). To prevent bacteria growth after damp use, lightly spray your Pressed Pigment with rubbing alcohol when it’s dry, then use a tissue to gently wipe off the top layer of product.

DRY USE:  When used dry, Pressed Pigments aren’t usually as intense for either color payoff or sheen/glitter and appear more as a soft wash of color and shimmer. I recommend using the same brushes for dry application on the eyelid, but make sure you tap off excess product to avoid fallout. These don’t apply all that well with a fluffy type of brush and will give you fallout if you use a brush like that or try to blend them too much. Another dry use for the more natural skin tone-like shades of Pressed Pigments is as a highlighter below the brow, on the tops of the cheekbones, down the bridge of nose, above the cupid’s bow of your lip, even on the collarbone, etc… Anywhere you want some shimmer and glow. For an application like this, you can use a dense brush or a fluffier brush, depending on how much shimmer and color you want. My favorite brushes for this type of application are the MAC 286 and 288 Duo Fibre brushes… The 286 if fluffier and domed, so it will give you a lighter application, while the 288 is more dense and flat and will apply the Pressed Pigment a bit more heavily. For a super light highlight application, use a Duo Fibre fan brush, like a MAC 184 (from MAC PRO).

Okay, now that I’ve explained all of that, I’ll tell you where you can get these babies! Pressed Pigments were released last Thursday, August 1st, so they’re available now online at www.maccosmetics.com or at your local MAC store or counter. Some of these are limited edition, while some will be staying in the permanent range, which I will specify in each review. Each Pressed Pigment contains 3 g / .10 US oz of product and sells for $21.

Pressed Pigments Part 2 Labels

Left: Dry     Right: Damp Photo taken outdoors in natural sunlight. Pressed Pigments swatched on NC20 skin.

Left: Dry                               Right: Damp
Click photo to enlarge.
Photo taken outdoors in natural sunlight. Pressed Pigments swatched on NC20 skin.

Amethyst

Amethyst

Amethyst

Amethyst

Amethyst:   This is described as a “purple with silver undertone”… It’s a light, cool toned lavender color with loads of silvery shimmer. It’s not the smoothest applying of all the Pressed Pigments, but it’s still pretty. The color payoff is very subtle when applied dry and it did give a bit of fallout. When applied damp, the color payoff and coverage improved, but still wasn’t opaque or intense. I do like this Pressed Pigment but I feel like it’s best as a soft all over lid color and looks best when paired up with darker, more dramatic colors in the crease. You can also use Amethyst on the lips, especially with light, cool pink or lavender lips, for an added pop of shimmer in the very center of your lip!

Overall Rating:   3.7 / 5

Application:   4

Coverage:  3

Color Payoff:   3

Texture:   3

Wear Time:   4

Packaging:   5

Beaming

Beaming

Beaming

Beaming

Beaming:   Beaming was limited edition and released nearly a year ago with the Face & Body collection, but some locations do still have this in stock, so it’s worth picking up if you can! It’s warm, medium golden brown with some tan/coppery tones and fine shimmer particles. Dry, it has good color payoff, applies smoothly, and gives very good, though not 100% opaque coverage. Applied damp, Beaming shows more of the coppery tones, becomes more metallic, and gives even better color payoff and complete coverage. If you can find this Pressed Pigment, get it! It’s really beautiful, especially for summer and fall! Beaming can also be used as a highlight on the cheeks or body for warm, medium-dark to deep skintones.

Overall Rating:   4.3 / 5

Application:   4

Coverage:  4

Color Payoff:   5

Texture:   4

Wear Time:   4

Packaging:   5

Black Grape

Black Grape

Black Grape

Black Grape

Black Grape:   Black Grape is a “deep aubergine with multi pearl”… In the pan, it looks like a slightly purple, silvery black but once it’s applied, it really transforms! When applied dry, it’s a medium-dark plummy black with lots of shimmer, good color payoff, and great coverage. Dampened, this is a medium-dark to dark, cool toned, blackened plum with a nearly metallic, pearly finish. Damp, I got completely opaque coverage and intense color payoff. Either dry or damp, it applies smoothly with little to no fallout. Black Grape is one of the colors that has been added to the permanent line of Pressed Pigments… It’s perfect for a new twist on a smoky eye!

Overall Rating:   4.5 / 5

Application:   4

Coverage:  5

Color Payoff:   5

Texture:   4

Wear Time:   4

Packaging:   5

Blue Willow

Blue Willow

Blue Willow

Blue Willow

Blue Willow:   This is a “light icy blue” with a super shimmery, frosted finish. It’s a light, cool toned, aqua-tinged blue with oodles of shimmer particles that aren’t as fine they are in some other Pressed Pigments… Unfortunately, that seems to make this apply a little unevenly. Dry, this is pretty sheer and doesn’t give a lot of color payoff. Applied damp, this gives better, although not completely opaque, coverage and much better color payoff. Dampened, Blue Willow also becomes nearly metallic and gives a very frosty type of finish. Blue Willow is part of MAC’s permanent range of Pressed Pigments.

Overall Rating:   3.7 / 5

Application:   4

Coverage:  3

Color Payoff:   3

Texture:   3

Wear Time:   4

Packaging:   5

Damson

Damson

Damson

Damson

Damson:   Damson is a “deep brown with gold pearl” and is, unfortunately, one of the limited edition Pressed Pigments that was recently released. It’s a beautiful, warm toned, bronzed brown with some maroon/plum undertones and a golden bronze shimmer. In the pan it looks waaaaay more bronze than it is once applied… When you apply Damson dry, it gives good color payoff but isn’t opaque and appears as a medium, warm golden bronze with plenty of shimmer. Applied damp, it gives fully opaque coverage and fantastic color payoff, bringing out the plum/maroon bronze tones. Damson applied very smoothly both dry and damp and gave me little to no fallout.

Overall Rating:   4.5 / 5

Application:   4

Coverage:  5

Color Payoff:   5

Texture:   4

Wear Time:   4

Packaging:   5

MAC has had Pressed Pigments as part of their permanent range for a little over a year but last week they released some new colors and decided to repromote some of their current, permanent ones. This is still a relatively new formula that some people may not even realize exists, so I’m glad they decided to expand their color range and repromote this product!

Because there are so many of these, I’ll be posting these reviews in parts so it’s not one huge, overwhelming post! To start out with, these are some that I reviewed previously when I got them last year… So here you go… Enjoy Pressed Pigments Part 1!

Pressed Pigments Part 1 Product Photo

Pressed Pigments are their own type of product… They’re not like the loose pigments that many of you are probably used to. This is MAC’s description of this product:

“An intensely creamy highlighter offering extreme pearlescence and versatility of finish. Apply dry for a high shine, or on damp skin for a dramatic wet look. Provides eye-catching sheer-to-moderate buildable coverage and natural dimension finish. Pressed Pigment is delicate. Please handle with care.”

To break that down, Pressed Pigments are a creamy feeling powder… They are not an actual cream product. They are extremely versatile, which I will get to in the next paragraph or two, and can be used for many purposes, which I will also explain. These are finely milled, though not as smooth as loose pigments are. The glitter/shimmer particles range from small to, well, not to small, which tends to be the biggest factor in how smoothly these apply, either dry or damp. Overall, I love these and I like how shimmery they are and how they can be applied for a soft wash of color and shine or applied so that your eyelid looks like an intense, bright little disco ball. Also, as far as the “handle with care” part goes… Do just that. These break easily if dropped and can crack if you dig at them with a spatula or anything, so be gentle with your Pressed Pigments!

This is a product that you have to work with in order to appreciate… But don’t let that scare you away from trying these out! It’s not your average eye shadow and doesn’t usually apply easily when treated like it’s one. Typically, when I apply these to the eye, I use them damp because it wears longer and goes on with little to no fallout (you know, that glittery fairy vomit that ends up below your eyes). Applied to the face, lip, or even body (like the collarbone) as a highlight, I tend to use these dry because I don’t want that super glittery intensity.

APPLICATION TIPS: Aside from the typical damp,dry applications, here are a few other tips for you…

1) Wear a primer underneath your Pressed Pigment, whether you apply it dry or damp. This will make it wear longer and prevent any creasing. My favorites are MAC Paint Pots or Pro Longwear Paint Pots. You can use a neutral color like Soft Ochre, Painterly, or Groundwork, or use one that has some shine and color to it that will match, intensify, or even transform the color of the Pressed Pigment (Blackground is a nice one if you wanna intensify or transform… Seriously, play around with it and see what happens).

2) Apply Pressed Pigments to the lid AFTER you do your crease or blending colors that will go around it. Or apply them VERY carefully after you put your Pressed Pigment on. When you use a fluffy blending brush, like a MAC 217 or 222 on or around a Pressed Pigment, it’s going to spread the shimmer/glitter particles to areas that you may not want them.

3) Aside from your typical damp or dry use with a brush, you can apply these dry with your fingers. If you do this, gently swipe your finger over the Pressed Pigment, but don’t dig it in there with too much pressure (this smashes down the powder and hardens it)… By applying with your finger, it’s going to warm up the product and mix it with the natural oils on your skin. When you apply it to the eyelid like this, it feels super creamy and gives good coverage and color payoff with a very smooth application. You can also use this technique for a highlight on the tops of the cheekbones or anywhere you want a glow to the face, just make sure you don’t load up too much product on your fingertip. Oh! And you can tap a little on the center of your lip for a shimmery pouty look 😉

DAMP USE:   You will get the most intense color payoff and shimmer/sheen if you use Pressed Pigments with a dampened brush. When you use them like this, it also lessens the chance that you’ll have any issues with fallout below the eye. The trick with these is using the right brush! When you apply these damp to the eyelid, I suggest using a MAC 215 Medium Shader Brush, which was released with the Pressed Pigments. You can also use a MAC 239 or 242 (my personal favorite)… A MAC 249, 252, or 287 will work for larger lids, while for more detail or a smaller lid, you can use a MAC 212, 231, 228, or 214. Basically, you want a brush that’s somewhat flat and dense, and the more dense your brush is, the more product it will apply. Also, the smoother and flatter the brush, the smoother the application will be. After you choose which brush to use, you will want to dampen the brush with something like MAC Fix + Spray or Water Base Mixing Medium (from MAC PRO). Once the brush is dampened, swipe it across one area of the Pressed Pigment and tap off excess product. TIP: Only use one area of the Pressed Pigment as a designated “damp area” so it does not create a sort of crust on the rest of the product, which can make it difficult to use dry. I usually use a small area at the top of each one so I remember where my damp spot is. Also, try not to spray the product itself, as it will surely form a crust and can promote the growth of bacteria (gross!). To prevent bacteria growth after damp use, lightly spray your Pressed Pigment with rubbing alcohol when it’s dry, then use a tissue to gently wipe off the top layer of product.

DRY USE:  When used dry, Pressed Pigments aren’t usually as intense for either color payoff or sheen/glitter and appear more as a soft wash of color and shimmer. I recommend using the same brushes for dry application on the eyelid, but make sure you tap off excess product to avoid fallout. These don’t apply all that well with a fluffy type of brush and will give you fallout if you use a brush like that or try to blend them too much. Another dry use for the more natural skin tone-like shades of Pressed Pigments is as a highlighter below the brow, on the tops of the cheekbones, down the bridge of nose, above the cupid’s bow of your lip, even on the collarbone, etc… Anywhere you want some shimmer and glow. For an application like this, you can use a dense brush or a fluffier brush, depending on how much shimmer and color you want. My favorite brushes for this type of application are the MAC 286 and 288 Duo Fibre brushes… The 286 if fluffier and domed, so it will give you a lighter application, while the 288 is more dense and flat and will apply the Pressed Pigment a bit more heavily. For a super light highlight application, use a Duo Fibre fan brush, like a MAC 184 (from MAC PRO).

Okay, now that I’ve explained all of that, I’ll tell you where you can get these babies! Pressed Pigments were released last Thursday, August 1st, so they’re available now online at www.maccosmetics.com or at your local MAC store or counter. Some of these are limited edition, while some will be staying in the permanent range, which I will specify in each review. Each Pressed Pigment contains 3 g / .10 US oz of product and sells for $21.

Pressed Pigments Neutral Labels

Left:   Applied Dry     Right: Applied Damp Photo taken outdoors in natural sunlight. Pressed Pigments swatched on NC20 skin.

Left: Applied Dry                                    Right: Applied Damp
Photo taken outdoors in natural sunlight. Pressed Pigments swatched on NC20 skin.

Light Touch

Light Touch

Light Touch:   This is a “high-pearl powder in W10 shade” and is part of the permanent range… Overall it’s a light, warm, peachy beige with loads of pearly shimmer. Applied dry, this is a warm, fleshy toned color with a hint of shimmer and gives good color payoff, though not full opacity. Dry, this does give a bit of fallout, as the shimmer particles are not as small as they are in some other Pressed Pigments. When applied damp, it’s a super high shine, light warm beige with fully opaque coverage and great color payoff. Light Touch is suitable for both an eye shadow as well as a highlighter anywhere else.

Overall Rating:   4 / 5

Application:   4

Coverage:  4

Color Payoff:   4

Texture:   3

Wear Time:   4

Packaging:   5

Blonde Streak

Blonde Streak

Blonde Streak:   This is a “light cream” Pressed Pigment with small, but highly reflective shimmer particles, so it feels smooth and applied well both dry and damp. Dry, I only had a tiny bit of fallout and got nearly opaque coverage and very good color payoff. Damp, Blonde Streak became an even paler type of cream color with slightly cooler undertones than it has when applied dry. It also became very pearly and applied 100% opaque. Blonde Streak is part of the permanent range of Pressed Pigments. This color works well as a highlighter on light to medium skintones.

Overall Rating:   4.5 / 5

Application:   4

Coverage:  5

Color Payoff:   5

Texture:   4

Wear Time:   4

Packaging:   5

Day Gleam

Day Gleam

Day Gleam:   Day Gleam is a “high-pearl powder in NC30 shade” and is part of MAC’s permanent range of pressed pigments. It’s a medium, very slightly cool toned, golden color. The color payoff and coverage are great both dry and damp, although it has more shine and it slightly more opaque when applied damp. It has a pretty smooth texture too, thanks to the shimmer/glitter particles being small. Day Gleam is versatile and will work as both an eye shadow or a highlighter on medium to medium-dark skintones.

Overall Rating:   4.5 / 5

Application:   4

Coverage:  5

Color Payoff:   5

Texture:   4

Wear Time:   4

Packaging:   5

Deeply Dashing

Deeply Dashing

Deeply Dashing:   This is a “high pearl powder in NW55 shade”… It’s a warm toned, medium to medium dark, rich chocolatey brown. It’s lighter and softer applied dry, but still gives god coverage and color payoff. Damp, this becomes darker and much more shimmery/pearly and gives 100% opaque coverage. Either way, it applies smoothly since the shimmery bits are small. You can use this as an eye shadow or as a highlighter if you have a dark to deep skintone. Deeply Dashing is part of MAC’s permanent range of Pressed Pigments.

Overall Rating:   4.5 / 5

Application:   4

Coverage:  5

Color Payoff:   5

Texture:   4

Wear Time:   4

Packaging:   5

Jet Couture

Jet Couture

Jet Couture:   Jet Couture is a “charcoal black” and is part of the permanent range of Pressed Pigments. It’s a warm toned black with a golden type of shimmer. Dry, it’s more on the charcoal side and doesn’t apply totally opaque. Damp, this goes on with full opacity and appears as a deep, super shimmery black that’s perfect for a smoky eye. Jet Couture’s shimmer particles aren’t as small as they are in some other pressed pigments but it still applies smoothly.

Overall Rating:   4.5 / 5

Application:   4

Coverage:  5

Color Payoff:   5

Texture:   4

Wear Time:   4

Packaging:   5